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Full text of "War cook book"

EVERY KITCHEN IS A FORT OF 
NATIONAL DEFENSE 



Issued by the 

WOMAN'S COMMITTEE 

Council of National Defense 

KENTUCKY DIVISION 



-'? '#;>^" -^ 



WAR COOK BOOK 

BY 

MARY E. SWEENY, 

Head of Home Economics Department 
University of Kentucky 

Chairman Food Production and Home Economics 

Committee, Kentucky Division, Council of 

National Defense 

LINDA B. PURNELL, 

Assistant in Foods and Nutrition 
University of Kentucky 



Copyright 1918 
By Mary E. Sweeny 



Mayes Printing Company 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 



ep. 



CONTENTS. 

Liberty Yeast Breads 13 

Cereal Quick Breads 16 

Breakfast Cereals 23 

Left over cereals. 

Vegetable Substitute for Wheat 26 

Root Vegetables as Substitutes for Wheat 27 

Meats 28 

Substitutes for beef, mutton and pork: 
Animal Organs 
Meat Stretchers 
Game 
Fish 
Poultry 
Cream Soups 
Cheese 
Eggs 
Vegetables 

Fats 64 

Salad Dressings 

Sugarless Sweets 73 

Candies 
Sauces 76 

Marmalades and Jellies 

Vegetables 81 

Patriotic Salads 86 

War Time Desserts 90 

Cakes 

Cookies 

Puddings and Custards 

Pastry and Pie fillings 

Frozen Desserts 
Conservation of Clothing _ „ 105 



4 WARCOOKBOOK 

. STAND GUARD IN YOUR KITCHEN OVER 
YOUR COUNTRY'S FOOD SUPPLY. 

Your country is at war, and every man, woman 
and child must help. All the blood and all the sacri- 
fice, all the men and munitions in the world can not 
win this war unless you and I feed the men who are 
doing the fighting. Your government asks you to eat 
the foods Avhich are abundant, nourishing, and which 
can not be shipped, and to send the wheat, meat, sugar 
and animal fats, which are needed and can be shipped, 
to our soldiers and their allies. Our associates in this 
war can not be fed unless we use carefully all the 
foods available. The women of America must see to 
it that the sacrifice of life and money is not in vain. 

In a spirit of service the War Cook Book is given 
to the women of Kentucky, with the hope that it offers 
to every home wishing to stand guard over the food 
supply the suggestions, directions and timely aids it 
needs. 

Acknowledgment is gratefully made to the labora- 
tories of the Home Economics Department, University 
of Kentuclr>% which have rendered valuable service in 
testing and preparing recipes, to the suggestions of 
many friends, and to material borrowed from State 
University bulletins. Government publications, and 
various commercial firms. 

' ' SAVE AND SERVE ' ' 



WAR COOKBOOK 5 

EACH MEAL SHOULD CONTAIN FOOD FROM 
EACH OF THESE GROUPS : 

1. Vegetables and fruits. 

2. Milk, eggs, fish, meat, cheese, beans, peas, peanuts. 

3. Cereals — corn meal, oatmeal, rice, bread and others. 

4. Sugar, syrups, jelly, honey. 

5. Fats — butter, margarine, cottonseed oil, olive oil, 

drippings, suet. 

You can exchange one food for another in the same 
group. Every food can be put into one of these groups. 
Each group serves a special purpose in nourishing 
your body. 

REASONS WHY YOU NEED THE FIVE 
GROUPS. 

Fruits and vegetables furnish some of the material 
from which the body is made and keep its many parts 
working smoothly. They help prevent constipation 
which gives you headaches and makes you stupid. The 
kinds you choose depend upon the season, but remem- 
ber that the cheaper ones are often as valuable as the 
more expensive. 

Milk, eggs, fisJi, meat, peas, beans. These help 
build up the growing body and renew used-up parts. 
That is their main business. Dried peas and beans 
make good dishes to use in place of meat part of the 
times, but don't leave out the other foods entirely. 
Milk is the most important. Buy at least a pint a day 
for every member of your family. No other food can 
take its place for children. Save on meat if you must, 
but don't skimp on milk. 

Cereals. Bread and breakfast foods. These foods 
act as fuel to let you do your work, much as the gaso- 



6 WARCOOKBOOK 

line burning in an automobile engine makes the car 
'go. This you can think of as their chief business. 
And they are usually your cheapest fuel. Besides, 
they give your body some building material. 

Sugar and Syrups are fuel, too, and they give flavor 
to other foods. They are valuable food, but many 
people eat more of them than they need. Sweet fruits, 
of course, contain much sugar and are better for the 
children than candy. 

Fat is fuel. Some is needed especially by hard- 
working people. Remember that expensive fats are 
no better fuel than cheap ones. Use drippings. Don't 
let your butcher keep the trimmings from your meat. 
They belong to you. Children need some butter fat. 
Give it to them in plenty of whole milk or in butter. 



WAR COOK BOOK 



MEATLESS AND WHEATLESS DAY MENU. 

Breakfast. 

Orange Oatmeal Corn Muffins 



Whole milk 



Sugar 



Coffee 

Lunch. 

Cream of Celery Soup Potato Salad 

Oatmeal Biscuit Baked Apple Avith Raisins 

Dinner. 

Salmon Loaf Carrots Buckwheat Muffins 

Lettuce Salad Butter 

Cornflour wafers 

HOW THIS MENU SUPPLIES BODY NEEDS. 



BODY CEREALS AND 
BUILDING i STARCH 


SUGAR 


FATS 


FRUITS & 
VEGETABLES 


Whole Milk 


Oatmeal 
Corn Muffins 


BREAKFAST 
Sugar 


Butter 


Orange 


Cream Soup 


Oatmeal Biscuit 
Potato 


LUNCH 
Raisins 


Butter, Salad 
Dressing 


Lettuce (Salad) 
Apple 


Salmon Loaf 


Buckwheat Muf- 
fins, Carrots, 
Cornmeal 
Wafers 


DINNER 


Butter, Olive 
Oil Dressing 


Lettuce Salad 



WAR COOK BOOK 



MEATLESS DAY. 

Breakfast — 
Prunes 
Fried mush 
Eggs with cream sauce 
Butter 
Coffee or tea 

Lunch — 

Bean loaf 

Barley yeast bread 

Butter 

Rice with tomato sauce 

Dinner — 
Scalloped salted cod Rye biscuit 
Potato dumplings Fruit salad 

Peas or beets Mayonnaise 

War cake 

HOW THIS MENU SUPPLIES BODY NEEDS. 



BODY 
BUILDING 


CEREALS AND 
STARCH 


SUGAR 


FATS 


FRUITS & 
VEGETABLES 


Eggs, Cream 
Sauce 


Mush 


BREAKFAST 


Butter 


Prunes 


Bean Loaf 


Barley Bread 
Rice 


LUNCH 


Butter 


Tomato Sauce 


Fish 


Potato Dump- 
lings, Peas or 
Beets, Rye 
Biscuit 


DINNER 
War Cake 


Butter 
Mayonnaise 


Fruit Salad 



WARCOOKBOOK 9 

AS A KITCHEN SOLDIER SALUTE YOUR COUN- 
TRY'S FLAG. ANSWER THE ROLL CALL 
OF YOUR ALLIES' NEED. 

1. How MUCH MEAT HAVE I Sent today to the soldier 

holding the trenches for me in France ? 

2. Have I substituted for wheat bread today? 

3. How MUCH fat have I given today ? 

4. Have I shared my sugar f 

5. Have I used home-grown products and freed the 

railroads to carry food to the allies ? 

Send 1-3 of your beef Eat instead poultry 
pork jfish 

bacon cheese 

mutton beans 

wheat flour oats, corn, rye 

lard vegetable oils 

sugar syrups, honey 



10 WARCOOKBOOK 

The Reasons for Our Saving: 

' ' The men of the Allied Nations are fighting ; they 
are not on the farms. Even the men of the European 
neutral countries are under arms. The fields of both Al- 
lies and neutrals lack man-power, fertilizer and ma- 
chinery. Hence, the production of food by these coun- 
tries has steadily lessened ever since the beginning of 
the war, while, at the same time, the shortage of ship- 
ping has grown more and more serious, with the conse- 
quent steady increase of difficulties in bringing food 
from the faraway markets of India, Australia and the 
Argentine. 

The situation has become critical. There is simply 
not enough food in Europe, yet the soldiers of the 
Allies must be maintained in full strength ; their wives 
and children at home must not face famine ; the friend- 
ly neutrals must not be starved ; and, finally, our own 
army in France must never lack a needed ounce of 
food. 

There is just one way in which all these require- 
ments can be met. North America must furnish the 
iood. And we must furnish it from our savings be- 
cause we have already sent our normal surplus. 

We do not need to starve our own people. We 
have plenty for ourselves, and it is the firm policy of 
the Food Administration to retain for our people, by 
its control of exports, a sufficient supply of every es- 
sential foodstuff. We want nobody in our country to 
eat less than is necessary for good health and full 
strength, for America needs the full productive power 
of all its people. Much of the needed saving can be 
effected by substituting one kind of food for another. 
But the time has come to put aside all selfishness and 
disloyalty. The time has come for sacrifice. 



WARCOOKBOOK 11 

The Allies ask us to meet only their absolutely im- 
perative needs. They are restricting the consumption 
of their own people to the minimum necessary for 
health and strength. They are controlling their food 
by drastic government regulation. There is even ac- 
tual privation among their women and children ; there 
is starvation in Belgium. 

The Allies need wheat and meat and fats and 
sugar. They must have more of all these than we have 
been sending, more than we shall be able to send unless 
we restrict our own consumption. We can do this 
iw^ithout harm, for, as a nation, we are today eating 
and wasting much more food than we need. 

The whole great problem of winning the war rests 
primarily on one thing; the loyalty and sacrifice of 
the American people in the matter of food. It is not 
a government responsibility, it is the responsibility of 
each individual. Each pound of food saved by each 
American citizen is a pound given to the support of 
our army, the Allies and the friendly neutrals. Each 
pound wasted or eaten unnecessarily is a pound with- 
held from them. It is a direct personal obligation on 
the part of each of us to some one in Europe whom 
Ave are bound to help. 

If we are selfish or even careless, we are disloyal, 
we are the enemy at home. Now, is the hour of our 
testing. Let us make it the hour of our victory ; vic- 
tory over ourselves; victory over the enemy of Free- 
dom. ' ' Herbert Hoover, United States Food Adminis- 
trator. 



12 



WAR COOK BOOK 



TABLE OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 



Material 


Weight 


Measure 


Apricots 


1 lb. 


75 pieces 


Bananas 


1 lb. 


o large 


Beans, Navy 


1 lb. 


2 1-3 cups 


Beans, canned — 






String No. 2 


1 lb. 2 oz. 


1 2-3 cups, drained 


Lima No. 2 


1 lb. 4 oz. 


1 2-3 cups, drained 


Bread- 






Graham 


12 oz. 


14 Va-inch slices 


Rye, Ward's 


1 lb. 


21 Va-inch slices 


White, Ward's 


1 lb. 2 oz. 


16 %-inch slices 


Whole Wheat, Ward's 


1 lb. 4 oz. 


15 i/s-inch slices 


Butter 


1 lb. 


48 squares 


Milk, condensed 


6 oz. 


2-3 cup 


Molasses No. 2% 


2 lbs. 6 oz. 


2% cups 


Pineapple — 






No. 1 flat 


9 oz. 


5 slices 


No. 2 tall 


1 lb. 3 oz. 


10 slices 


Prunes — • 






Small 


1 lb. 


40 prunes 


Large 


1 lb. 


28-30 prunes 


Tapioca — 






Instant 


10 oz. 


1 3-7 cups 


Pearl 


1 lb. 


2 1-7 cups 


Minute 


10 oz. 


1 3-7 cups 



1 ounce of sugar measures 2 level tablespoons. 

1-3 ounce of butter measures 2 level teaspoons 

2 ounces of flour measures ^ cup. 

All recipes serve six persons unless 
otherwise indicated. 



WARCOOKBOOK 13 

Liberty Yeast Breads 

YEAST BREADS. 

If you have a good rule for bread use it, but in 
place of part of white flour use one of these other 
grains — either all or part of time. If dry yeast is 
used, a sponge should be made at night with the liquid 
the yeast and a part of white flour. 

CORN MEAL YEAST BREAD (1 loaf) 

l'j4 cups milk and water or water (10 ounces) 

1 tablespoon fat (^^ ounce). 

2 teaspoons salt (^ ounce). 

2-3 cup corn meal (3 1-3 ounces). 
2^ cups flour (9 1-3 ounces). 

y2 cake compressed yeast {}i ounce). 

% cup warm water (2 ounces). 

Add salt to liquid and bring to boiling point. Add 
corn meal slowly, stirring constantly until all is ad- 
ded. Remove from the fire, cool mixture, and add com- 
pressed yeast softened in ^4 cup warm water. Add 
.2 1-3 cups flour and knead. Let rise until about 
double its bulk, knead again, and put in the pan. When 
light, bake in a moderate oven for at least an hour. 

In mixing the dough the flour and corn meal are 
to be used as separate ingredients, because the corn 
meal must be scalded or a grainy bread results. When 
the corn meal mixture is removed from the stove, the 
housewife will doubt her ability to add the amount of 
flour called for. The flour will work in, as required, 
but a stiffer, stickier dough than that to whch she is 
accustomed will result. 



14 WARCOOKBOOK 

OATMEAL YEAST BREAD (1 loaf). 

1 cup milk and water, or water (8 ounces). 
1 teaspoon salt {%. ounce). 
1 tablespoon fat ( ^ ounce) . 
1 cup rolled oats (2% ounces). 
2y2 cups w^heat flour (10 ounces). 
^ cake compressed yeast {}i. ounce). 
}i cup warm water (2 ounces). 
Scald liquid and pour it over the rolled oats and 
fat, and salt. Let stand until lukewarm (about half 
an hour). Add yeast softened in warm water. Add 
flour and knead. Let rise until double its bulk. Knead 
again and place in pan. When light, bake in a mod- 
erate oven from 45 to 60 minutes. 

POTATO YEAST BREAD. 

1/2 cup milk and water, or water (4 ounces). 

4 tablespoons fat (2 ounces). 
1^ teaspoons salt m, ounce). 

4 cups boiled potatoes. 

8 cups flour (32 ounces). 
^ cake compressed yeast {}i ounce ) 
%. cup warm water (2 ounces). 

Introductory statements: 

Boiled potatoes mashed combined with wheat flour 
may be used in making a bread of good flavor and 
texture. The potato bread is slightly darker in color 
than patent flour bread, and is also somewhat moist. 
It is relished by persons who do not care for any so- 
called ''white-bread." Two manipulations are satis- 
factory. Either all the flour may be added in the 
first mixture, making a dough which is very stiff and 
difficult to knead, or a part of the flour may be re- 



WARCOOKBOOK 15 

served and added with the second kneading. In either 
ease the dough is soft at the second handling, but af- 
ter baking it produces a satisfactory loaf. The above 
amounts make three loaves of bread. 

RYE YEAST BREAD. 

1 cup milk and water, or water (10 ounces). 

1 tablespoon fat (>4 ounce). 

1 teaspoon salt {j4- ounce). 
2}i cups rye flour (7 ounces). 
2j4 cups wheat flour (9 ounces). 

y2 cake compressed yeast (^ ounce). 

2 tablespoons water (1 ounce). 

Combine ingredients. Mix into dough and knead. 
Let rise until double original bulk. Knead again. When 
again double bulk, bake about 45 minutes. 

BARLEY BREAD. 

^ cup milk. 2 cups wheat flour 

^ cup water. 1 tablespoon fat 

1 cup barley flour, or 1 teaspoon salt. 
Ij4 cups hot barley mush ^ yeast cake 

}i cup lukewarm water 

Prepare and bake as rye bread. 

BRAN BREAD. 

4 cups bran 1J4 teaspoons salt 

2 cups wheat flour 3 tablespoons fat 
^ cup molasses ^ yeast cake 

2 cups milk or water ^ cup lukewarm water 
Make sponge, using flour. When this is light add 
the bran and proceed as in entire wheat bread. 



16 WARCOOKBOOK 

Cereal Quick Breads 

CORN MUFFINS (Eggless) 

1^ cups corn meal 
y^ cup flour 

1 teaspoon salt 

4 teaspoons baking powder 

2 tablespoons shortening 
lYz cups milk 

Sift the dry ingredients into a bowl ; add milk and 
melted shortening; beat well and pour into well- 
greased pan or miiln'n tins and bake in hot oven about 
25 minutes. 

CORN MEAL SALAD WAFERS. 

3/2 cup corn meal 
3/2 cup wheat flour 
1 tablespoon fat 
^ teaspoon salt 

3 tablespoons milk (about). 

Sift the flour, meal and salt together. Cut in the 
fat and add the liquid. The dough should be stiff 
enough to be rolled into a very thin sheet. Cut into 
diamonds or other shapes. Bake quickly in a hot oven. 

CORN FLOUR GRIDDLE CAKES. 

1>4 cups corn flour 
Yz teaspoon soda 
y2 teaspoon salt 
1 cup sour milk 

1 ^^^ 
Sift the dry ingredients together, add the milk and 
beaten egg. Mix well and cook on hot griddle. The 
batter must be very thin. 



WARCOOKBOOK 17 

OATMEAL MUFFINS. 

iy2 cups milk (12 ounces). 
2 eggs (4 ounces) 
2 tablespoons fat (1 ounce) 

1 teaspoon salt (^ ounce) 

2 cups rolled oats (5>4 ounces) 

1 cup flour (4 ounces) 

4 teaspoons baking powder (1 ounce) 
Pour milk over oats and let soak ^ hour. Add 
eggs and melted fat. Add to dry ingredients, which 
have been sifted together. Bake 25 to 30 minutes. 
This makes 10 to 12 muffins. 

WAFER CORN BREAD. 

2 cups finely ground corn meal 
2 teaspoons baking powder 

J^ teaspoon salt 

1 Qgg 

1 tablespoon shortening 

2 cups milk 

2 tablespoons molasses (if desired) 
Mix thoroughly corn meal, baking powder and salt. 
Add melted shortening, molasses and well-beaten egg. 
Beat well. Pour into greased shallow pans (the batter 
should be about }i inch deep), and bake in hot oven 
until brown on both sides. The bread should be less 
than y2 inch thick when baked. 

OATMEAL BISCUIT. 

l>i cups flour 1 1-3 cups oatmeal 

J/2 teaspoon salt 2-3 cup water 

ly teaspoons baking powder 
6 tablespoons shortening 



18 WARCOOKBOOK 

Sift flour, baking powder, salt together. Add oat- 
meal, melted shortening and enough water to make a 
soft dough. Roll out thin on floured board; cut with 
biscuit cutter and bake in greased pan in moderate 
oven about 20 minutes 

BUCKWHEAT MUFFINS. 

1 cup buckwheat 
1 cup wheat flour 
4 teaspoons baking powder 
1 teaspoon salt 
1^ cups milk 
1 egg 

1 teaspoon melted fat 

Sift together dry ingredients, combine the milk, 
beaten eggs, melted fat and molasses. Add the liquid 
to the dry ingredients. Mix well and bake one-half 
hour in a moderately hot oven. 

CORN DODGERS. 

2 cups corn meal 

1 teaspoon salt 

2 teaspoons fat 

194 cups boiling water 
Pour boiling water over other materials. Beat 
well. When cool form into thin cakes and bake y^ 
hour in a hot oven. 

^'CORN HOT" MUFFINS 

1 cup Corn Hot 

1 cup Graham flour 

2 teaspoons baking powder 
y2 teaspoon salt 

^ cup sweet milk 
1 egg 



WARCOOKBOOK 19 

Pour milk over Corn Hot and let stand ten min- 
utes. Mix dry ingredients ; beat egg light and add to 
milk and mix with dry ingredients. Put into well 
greased muffin pans and bake fifteen or twenty min- 
utes in hot oven. 



BROWN BREAD (BAKED) 

1 cup Graham flour 

1 cup sour milk 

1 cup corn meal 

1 cup rye or wheat flour 

1 teaspoon soda 

1 teaspoon salt. 

Mix as steamed brown bread and bake one hour 
in a moderate oven. 



NUT BREAD. 

3 cups Graham flour 

5 teaspoons baking powder 
1^ teaspoons salt 

34 cup corn syrup 
1^ cups milk and water 

1 cup chopped nuts (not too fine), or 

1 cup raisins, washed and floured 

Mix together flour, baking powder and salt; add 
milk and water, sugar or corn syrup and nut meats or 
raisins. Put into greased loaf pan, allow to stand 
thirty minutes in warm place. Bake in moderate ov- 
en forty to forty-five minutes. 



20 WARCOOKBOOK 

BOSTON BROWN BREAD 

1 cup corn meal or corn flour 
1 cup rye meal 
1 cup Buckwheat flour 
2y2 teaspoons soda 

1 teaspoon salt 
^ cup molasses 

2 cups sour milk, or 
ly^ cups sweet milk. 

Mix and sift the dry ingredients and add the mo- 
lasses and milk. Beat thoroughly and steam 3>4 
hours in well-buttered, covered molds. Remove the 
covers and bake the bread long enough to dry the top. 
This may be made also with 1^ cups corn meal and 
rye meal. This serves eight people. 

RYE CINNAMON ROLLS. 

2 cups rye flour 

2 tablespoons raisins cut in small pieces 
4 teaspoons baking powder 
2 tablespoons sugar 
3/2 teaspoon salt 
4 tablespoons fat 

Water or condensed milk to make a soft dough 
(about 2-3 cup). 

Roll the dough about ^ inch thick and spread on 
it a little melted fat and the following mixture: 1 
teaspoon cinnamon, 3 tablespoons sugar, 1 tablespoon 
flour, 1 tablespoon water. Roll the sheet of dough into 
a cylinder and cut off ^ inch slices. Spread the top 
with sugar and cinnamon mixture, and bake. The 
dough may be sprinkled with sugar and cinnamon as 
preferred. 



WARCOOKBOOK 21 

BARLEY SPOON BREAD. 

4 cups boiling water 
1 teaspoon salt 

1 cup barley meal 

2 eggs 

2 tablespoons drippings 
Add barley meal to boiling salted water, stirring 
constantly. Cook in a double boiler one hour. Cool 
and add well-beaten eggs and fat. Turn into an oiled 
dish and bake in a moderate oven ^ hour. 

POTATO CORN MEAL MUFFINS. 

2 tablespoons fat 
1 egg well beaten 
1 cup milk 

1 cup mashed potatoes 
1 cup corn meal 
4 teaspoons baking powder 
1 teaspoon salt 
Mix in order given. Bake 40 minutes in hot oven. 
This makes 13 muffins. 

RYE BISCUIT. 

1 cup rye flour 

1 cup white flour or corn flour 
4 teaspoons baking powder 

y2 teaspoon salt 

2 teaspoons sugar 

3 tablespoons shortening 

2-3 cup liquid (milk and Avater) 
Mix and sift dry ingredients. Chop in. shortening 
till very fine. Add liquid carefully to make a soft 
dough. Pat out on a floured board and cut. Bake in 
an ungreased pan 10 to 12 minutes in a hot oven. 



22 WARCOOKBOOK 

SPOON BREAD. 

Yi cup coarse meal ^ teaspoon salt 

1 pint scalded milk 1 egg 

1 cup cooked rice 
1 tablespoon oleomargarine 
1 teaspoon baking powder 
Scald meal with milk; add shortening, salt, and 
rice and ^gg well-beaten. Lastly add baking powder. 
Pour in a baking dish and bake for 30 minutes in a 
moderate oven. 

Serve with a spoon. If fine meal is used, change 
the quantity to ^ cup. 

SPOON CORN BREAD. 

2 cups water 1 tablespoon butter 

1 cup milk 2 teaspoons salt 

1 cup white cornmeal 2 eggs 
Mix boiling water and corn meal and bring sloAvly 
to the boiling point and cook 5 minutes. Add eggs 
well-beaten and other ingredients. Beat thoroughly 
and bake in well-greased pan for 25 minutes in a hot 
oven. Serve from same dish with a spoon. This 
serves six people. 

OATMEAL BISCUITS. 
1 cup oatmeal 

1 cup rye or white flour 

2 tablespoons fat 

2 tablespoons baking powder liquid 

1 teaspoon salt. 
Mix the fat and flour, which has been sifted, with 
the baking powder and salt. Add enough liquid to 
make a soft dough. Turn onto a floured board and 
roll to about one-half inch in thickness. Cut with a 
floured biscuit cutter. Bake about 15 minutes. 



WARCOOKBOOK 23 

Breakfast Cereals 

CORN MEAL MUSH 

1 cup eornmeal 
y2 cup cold water 

1 teaspoon salt 

3 cups boiling water 

Mix meal with cold water and salt, add to boiling 
water. Boil 5 minutes. Steam in double boiler three 
hours. 

FRIED MUSH. 

Mush left over from breakfast may be packed in 
greased moulds and covered, which will prevent crust 
from forming. The next morning, slice thinly, dip in 
flour or meal and saute. 

FRIED MUSH WITH CHEESE. 

y^ cup eornmeal 

2 bups boiling water 
Yi teaspoon salt 

Yz teaspoon paprika 
Y2 cup grated cheese 
1 cup tomato sauce 

3 tablespoons fat for sauting 

Stir eornmeal gradually into boiling salted water. 
Cook over direct flame, stirring constantly, for 12 
minutes ; cook over hot water for 1 hour. Stir grated 
cheese, through mush, add paprika and turn into 
moulds. Cool until mush is ready to slice. Cut into 
thin slices and saute until golden brown. Serve with 
tomato sauce. 



24 



WAR COOK BOOK 



OATMEAL HASH. 

2y2 quarts water 
lyi cups rolled oats 

2 onions sliced 

5 potatoes cut in small pieces 

1 tablespoon cornstarch 

2 tablespoons fat. 

Boil the water and add oatmeal, potato and onion, 
3^ tablespoon of salt, and ^ teaspoon pepper. Cook 
for Yz hour. Brown cornstarch with fat and add to 
soup. Cook until thick. One cup of tomatoes adds 
to the flavor. 

LEFT OVER CEREALS. 
Griddle Cakes Made with Oatmeal, Rice, Hominy 

OR CORNMEAL MuSH. 

A general recipe w^hich may be varied to suit the 
materials on hand follows : 



LIQUID 


FLOUR 


EGG 


1 Cup Sweet 
Milk 

1 Cup Sour 
Milk 


U to n Cups 
i Cup 


1 (if desired) 
1 (if desired) 



FAT 


SALT 


BAKING 
POWDER 


SODA 


1 Tablespoon 
1 Tablespoon 


I Teaspoon 
\ Teaspoon 


3 Teaspoons 


^ Teaspoon 



WARCOOKBOOK 25 

Combine the milk, beaten egg and melted fat. Add 
this liquid in portions to the flour which has been sift- 
ed with the other dry ingredients. 

The cooked cereal may be used with the flour in 
the following proportions: 

1 cup liquid from 1-3 cup cooked cereal 

and 
1-3 cup flour 
to 1 cup cooked cereal 
and 
1 cup flour 
A little more or less flour may be necessary de- 
pending upon the amount of water used in cooking 
the cereal. The batter should be thin enough to spread 
on the griddle but should not run. 

HOMINY CROQUETTES. 

2 cups cold cooked hominy 
2 or 3 tablespoons milk 

1 Ggg 

2 tablespoons fat 
y^ teaspoon salt 

1-16 teaspoon white pepper 

2 tablespoons chopped parsley 

Bread crumbs enough to make right consist- 
ency. 

Warm the hominy and milk in a double boiler. Add 
the beaten egg, butter and seasoning. Cook until egg 
thickens. Spread mixture on a shallow plate to cool, 
then shape. Roll in fine bread crumbs which have 
been seasoned with salt and pepper. Dip in beaten 
egg and roll in crumbs again. Cook in deep fat until 
brown. Drain on unglazed paper. 



26 WARCOOKBOOK 

COOKED CEREAL MUFFINS. 

J4 cup flour 

4 teaspoons baking powder 
J4 teaspoon salt 
1 cup cooked cereal 
^cnp milk 
1 egg 

1 tablespoon melted fat 
Sift together the dry ingredients. Add the milk, 
beaten egg and melted fat to cooked cereals. Beat 
thoroughly. Finally add the sifted dry ingredients. 
Mix well. Bake in greased muffin tins about >4 hour 
in a moderately hot oven. 

Other cooked cereals or mashed potatoes may be 
used in this recipe. If the dough is too soft, add a 
little more flour, if too thick a little more cereal. 

VEGETABLE SUBSTITUTE FOR WHEAT. 

IRISH POTATO AND SWEET POTATO are substi- 
tutes for wheat. Five pounds of potatoes are equal 
to one pound of grain. Potatoes are three-fourths 
water, so greater weight is required to be equiva- 
lent to- flour. 

As A Food — The Irish potato is rich in the substances 
which regulate the body, also contains elements 
which promote growth in the bodies of children 
and repair in adults. The potato proteins or body 
building substances are fairly well balanced, its 
starch is just as digestible as starch of wheat. 

In the American home, potatoes are used as a 
flavoring food and not as a substitute for bread. 
We should increase our average consumption from 
7 ounces, or one large potato, to 11 ounces, or two 
potatoes a day, and let it replace a portion of the 



WARCOOKBOOK 27 

wheat flour we want to conserve. Irish and sweet 
potatoes can be combined with wheat flour and 
made into excellent bread. 

The following ways of preparing potatoes are sug- 
gested : 

Boiled 

Steamed 

Baked 

Stufted baked 

Scalloped 

Creamed 

Riced 

Mashed 

Franconia 

A la Goldenrod 

Soup 

Salad 

Stuffing for fowls 
Sweet Potatoes — 

Boiled 

Baked 

Mashed 

Glazed 

Browned 

Croquettes 

Sweet potato and apples 

ROOT VEGETABLES AS SUBSTITUTES FOR 
WHEAT 

Beets, Carrots, Turnips, Parsnips, Salsify, are 
splendid foods and can be used as partial substitutes 
for wheat bread. Approximately eight pounds are 
equal to one pound of wheat flour. At present they 
are used for flavor only, and their great value as food 
neglected. 



28 WARCOOKBOOK 

Meats 

WAYS OF REDUCING: 

We can reduce our consumption of beef, mutton 
and pork — 

(1) By using other foods which serve the same pur- 

pose in the diet; 

(2) By serving smaller portions of meat; 

(3) My using meat less frequently; 

(4) By paying careful attention to the use of meat 

bone, fat and small portions commonly trimmed 
off and thrown away ; 

(5) By utilizing all left-overs ; 

(6) By utilizing all cuts and organs of the animal to 

the best advantage; 

( 7 ) By combining meat with other foods in such a way 
that the meat flavor is extended; 

(8) By using meat substitutes. 

TOUGH CUTS OF MEAT. 

These can be made tender in preparation by using 
low moist heat for a long cooking period; by hacking 
as in flank steak; by pounding as in Swiss steak; or 
by grinding as in Hamburger steak, to break up the 
connective tissue and muscle fibers. 

PROCESSES FOR COOKING MEAT. 

If we reduce meat cooking to its simplest terms, we 
find there are only three processes for cooking meat. 
The process w^e choose depends on the cut we have and 
the results we desire. They are : 

1. Application of intense heat to keep in the juices as 
in broiling and roasting of tender cuts. 



WARCOOKBOOK 29 

2. Use of lower temperature (in almost cold water and 

heating slowly to less than boiling point) to ex- 
tract juices as in making soups from soup bones, 
gristle and very tough cuts. 

3. By a combination of these two processes which con- 

sists in searing meat over and then stewing it. 
The recipes following illustrate these three pro- 
cesses and modifications of it. 

ITALIAN METHOD FOR MAKING A TOUGH 
STEAK TENDER. 

Spread a tough steak with oil. Allow to remain 
several hours. Broil quickly, searing outside first, 
then allowing it to cook more slowly. When done, 
moisten it with 1 tablespoon vinegar. This softens 
the fibers. 

Meat Substitutes 

Animal Organs. 

LIVER. 

Veal liver is, of course, preferable, but beef liver 
may be made quite tender by boiling before cooking 
in the ordinary way. After boiling until tender, cut 
in half inch slices, remove the outside skin and veins, 
and dredge with cornmeal. Have ready a hot frying 
pan and a few slices of the portion of the bacon which 
'is not used for the army. Pry out the bacon and re- 
move to hot platter. Fry the slices of liver in the 
bacon fat. Serve with bacon. 

SWEET BREADS. 

Sweetbreads spoil quickly and should be removed 
from the paper as soon as possible. Plunge into cold 
water and let it stand one hour, changing water two 



30 WARCOOKBOOK 

or three times. Put in acidulated salted boiling water 
and cook slowly thirty minutes. Drain and plunge 
into cold water to keep white and firm. 

BROILED SWEETBREADS. 

After parboiling as above, split crosswise. Season 
with salt and pepper and broil eight minutes. Serve 
with lemon butter made by creaming four tablespoon- 
fuls oleomargarine and adding slowly two tablespoons 
of lemon juice. 

KIDNEYS. 

1 pair kidneys 

2 tablespoonfuls oleomargarine 
2 tablespoonfuls corn flour 

1 cup water 

1 teaspoon salt 

1 teaspoon kitchen bouquet 

1 tablespoonful mushroom catsup 

2 tablespoonfuls orange juice 
1 teaspoonful lemon juice 

Cayenne pepper 

Split fresh kidneys in halves, remove white fat and 
sinews from center. Cover with cold water and let 
heat over moderate fire. Just before boiling point is 
reached, drain from the water and cut into small 
pieces. Cover with cold water and heat again, but not 
letting the water reach the boiling point, as that will 
toughen the kidneys and they will have to be boiled 
a long time to make them tender again. Make a sauce 
by browning the oleomargarine in a pan, adding the 
flour, liquid and other ingredients. 



WARCOOKBOOK 31 



BRAISED TONGUE. 



1 beef tongue 
1-3 cup carrots, diced 

1 sprig parsley 
1-3 cup onions 
yi cup celery, diced 
Place tongue in fireless cooker vessel and heat to 
boiling. Place in fireless cooker with hot plate. Leave 
two or three hours. Take out and remove skin and 
roots. Place back in fireless cooker pan and surround 
with vegetables. Add four cups of sauce made accord- 
ing to the next recipe. Cover closely, reheat stone and 
return to fireless cooker. Bake two to three hours 
longer. 

SAUCE FOR BRAISED TONGUE. 

Melt ^ cup oleomargarine. Add ^ cup corn flour 
and stir together until well browned. Add gradually 
4 cups of hot water in which the tongue was cooked. 
Season with salt, pepper and 1 teaspoon Worcester- 
shire sauce. One and one-half cups strained tomatoes 
may be substituted for part of the water. 

STUFFED HEART. 

Wash heart well, removing veins, arteries and clot- 
ted blood. Stuff with a dressing made from one cup 
breadcrumbs, three tablespoonfuls corn oil, small 
onion, sage and parsley. Brown the heart in a small 
amount of fat in the fireless cooker vessel. Be sure it 
is well browned on all sides. Add a cup and a half 
of hot water, a bay leaf, two cloves and a fourth tea- 
spoonful of peppercorns. Heat to boiling and place 
in fireless cooker with well-heated stone. Leave for 3 



32 WARCOOKBOOK 

to 4 hours. Just before serving, lift from the liquor 
and brown in oven. Thicken the stock and use as 
gravy. 

PIGS' FEET. 

Get fresh, well-cleaned pigs' feet and have them 
split down the center; w^ash w^ell and bring to a boil 
in enough water to cover. Place in fireless cooker with 
well-heated stone for four to five hours. At the end 
of this time they should be thoroughly softened. Make 
a batter, using one cup of milk, one and a fourth cups 
of corn flour, one egg, one teaspoonful of baking pow- 
der and one teaspoonful of salt. Dip pigs' feet in this 
mixture and saute in small amounts of vegetable oil 
until golden brown. 

HEAD-CHEESE. 

Dress one hog's head — or half a head, if a smaller 
quantity is desired — remove excess fat. Cover re- 
mainder with water and cook slowly until meat falls 
from the bones. Highly season the water during cook- 
ing with salt, pepper, sage. Take from the stock and 
concentrate the stock to one-half its original volume. 
Cut meat in small pieces, some of which may be re- 
served for scrapple. Eeheat in stock, put in mold to 
cool and set. Pigs' feet may be added to the head- 
cheese. 



WARCOOKBOOK 33 

MEAT STRETCHERS. 
CURRY BRISKET WITH RICE BORDER. 

2 pounds brisket 

1 teaspoon curry powder (mixture of spices) 

1 tablespoon chopped celery tops 

1 teaspoon celery seed, or 
y2 teaspoon celery 

2 cups cut onion 
1 tablespoon flour 

1 teaspoon salt 

Wipe meat with wet cheesecloth, cut in thin slices 
or cubes, seer in hot skillet ; if meat is very dry, take 
a piece of suet to prevent meat from sticking. Sear on 
all sides, then put in boiler and cover with boiling 
water, then put into cooker and let cook overnight. In 
skillet where meat was seared put onion and fry a light 
brown, add to meat, add salt and boil slowly until 
meat is tender. This method is used where there is no 
cooker. Mix flour and curry powder with a little cold 
water and boil 3 minutes. Serve with boiled rice 
border. 

MEAT PIE WITH POTATO CRUST. 

2 cups cooked meat 
1 small onion 

1 tablespoon parsley 

Seasonings, salt and pepper 
J4 cup stock 

Grind meat, mix with other ingredients, place in 
baking dish. Arrange seasoned mashed potatoes on 
top, set in oven to brown. . 



34 WARCOOKBOOK 

Game 

FRIED RABBIT. 

A young and tender rabbit is more palatable when 
fried. Cut in pieces suitable for cooking. Dip in 
cornmeal and brown in fat. Cover vessel well and al- 
low to cook slowly until each piece is thoroughly done. 
Remove rabbit and make a gravy, using corn flour and 
milk. Season with salt and pepper. 

RABBIT SAUSAGE. 

Where large numbers of rabbits are available, they 
may be utilized by making them into sausage. Dress 
and bone out the rabbit. Add one-fourth as much 
pork fat as there is rabbit meat. Grind all through 
meat chopper. Season with salt, pepper and sage. 

RABBIT IN CASSEROLE. 

1 rabbit 
% cup drippings or other fat 

1 cup hot water 

2 cups meat stock, or 

thickened gravy 
1 teaspoon lemon juice 
bit of bay leaf 

Dress the rabbit and separate into pieces at the 
joints. Season with paprika and salt. Cook in the 
fat until a golden brown. Transfer the meat to a cas- 
serole with 1 cup of hot water and cover. Bake in a 
moderate oven about one-half hour then add the stock 
or gravy, lemon juice and bay leaf. Continue cooking 
in the oven about 3 hours. 



WARCOOKBOOK 35 

MEAT SOUFFLE. 

Make a cream sauce of 1 pint hot milk, 2 table- 
spoons fat,, 4 tablespoons cornstarch, salt, pepper. Sea- 
son with chopped parsley and onion juice. Stir into 
it 1 to 2 cups chopped meat, chicken, tongue or lamb. 
When hot, add beaten yolks of 2 eggs. Cook 1 minute 
and set away to cool. Then stir in whites of eggs beat- 
en stiff. Bake in buttered dish. Serve immediately. 

RABBIT MOULD. 

Dress and cut up a rabbit. Cook slowly in season- 
ed boiling water until meat falls from the bone. Re- 
move rabbit. Concentrate soup stock to 2 cups. Strain 
and skim off fat. Decorate bottom of mold with pars- 
ley and slices of hard cooked eggs. Soak 1 tablespoon 
Knox gelatin in cold water and add to hot liquid. To 
this add the diced meat, ^ cup diced celery and 3 or 
4 strips pimento. Pour all into a mould to set. Other 
diced vegetables may be added if desired. Serve with 
boiled salad dressing. 



36 WARCOOKBOOK 



Fish 



"WHY EAT MORE FISH. 

1. It supplies building material, nationally more eco- 

nomical. 

2. They feed on water material — can be produced more 

cheaply. Cereals are used in production of meat. 

3. Cheaper — if properly selected. 

REASON FISH ARE NOT MORE GENERALLY 
USED. 

1. Lacks flavor. This can be added in preparation if 

proper care is taken. 

2. Fish has not been properly handled in shipping and 

in local stores, on which account there has been a 
deterioration in flavor. 

3. We are conservative — eat only the kinds we know. 

These are not available all during the year and 
the price is forced up during the seasons when it 
is available. 

BUYING OF FISH. 

1. Find the varieties recommended by the United 

States Government and ask for them. Insist that 
your dealer carry them. Look up their food 
value and the best methods for their preparation. 

2. In winter, use frozen fish. Thaw out slowly either 

in refrigerator or in cold water. 

3. Use fish all the week, so that the demand will be 

extended and it will be possible to get it on an- 
other day than Friday. 



WARCOOKBOOK 37 

4. A large niimber of perfectly good fish are being 

wasted each year because there is no demand for 
them. We are too conservative and cling to the 
use of certain well-known varieties, while others 
equally good are not used. 

5. If possible, buy local fish, to avoid shipping. This 

rule does not hold in winter, when it is almost 
impossible to get river fish. 

NEW KINDS OF FISH ESPECIALLY EE COM- 
MENDED BY BUREAU OF FISHERIES. 
BOWFIN. 

A lover of sluggish waters — Great Lakes, Missis- 
sippi Valley from Minnesota to the Gulf, and in the 
East from New York to Florida. Can be speared — 
in some cases are so close together that two may be 
speared at one thrust. When guarding the young may 
be caught with the hand. Fresh, the flesh is soft; is 
most desirable smoked. 

BURBOT. 

Fresh-water cousin to the cod. From Arctic Circle 
to Ohio and Missouri, especially in the Great Lakes 
and the larger waters of New England, New York, 
Canada and Alaska. Is sold skinned, dressed and de- 
capitated. May be obtained salted. 

POINTS TO BE REMEMBERED IN THE 
PREPARATION OF FISH. 

1. It is tender; therefore, long cooking for tenderness 

is not necessary. 

2. Flavor should be retained and added. 



38 WARCOOKBOOK 

3. Most fish lack fat ; therefore, the addition of it is 

desirable from the standpoint of food value as 
well as flavor. 

4. Small pieces of the thin portion of fish which are 

ordinarily cut off as trimmings, and are sold 
cheaper than the regular cuts, may be used very 
acceptably in chowder. It is also a good way to 
use left-over fish. The fish may be minced and 
the bones boiled for the stock. 
Methods commonly used are: Frying, Broiling, 
Baking, Boiling, Steaming. 

SAUCES FOE FISH. 
MAITRE D 'HOTEL BUTTER. 

yi cup butter substitute 

^ teaspoon salt 

1-3 teaspoon pepper 

54 tablespoon finely chopped parsley 

yi tablespoon lemon juice 
Cream butter in a bowl and with small wooden 
spoon work until creamy. Add salt, pepper and pars- 
ley, then lemon juice very slowly. 

HOLLANDAISE SAUCE, 

3^ cup butter substitute 
2 eggs (yolks only) 
1 tablespoonful lemon juice 
J4 teaspoon salt 

A few grains cayenne pepper 
1-3 cup boiling water 

Put one-third butter in a sauce-pan with the yolks 
of the eggs and lemon juice. Place over hot water and 



WARCOOKBOOK 39 

stir constantly until the butter is melted. Then add 
one-third more of the butter and, as it thickens, the 
last of the butter. Add the water and cook one min- 
ute. Season with salt and cayenne. 

SPANISH MACKEREL. 

Cream and wash well, bone. Fill with a stuffing 
prepared from the following ingredients : 
2 cups bread crumbs 
y^. cup oil 

small onion, sliced 
^ teaspoon sage 

chopped celery and parsley 
Lay in pan, cover with strips of salt pork and bake 
20 or 30 minutes. Any other fish may be prepared in 
the same way. 

SMOKED, SALTED OR DRIED FISH. 
SALT FISH. 

Salt, smoked and dried fish must be freshened by 
soaking in water from 12 to 24 hours and in some cases 
even longer. After freshening it may be prepared by 
baking or broiling. It should not be cooked at too 
high a temperature or the fibers of the fish are hard- 
ened too much. A dry salt fish is very good if baked 
in milk. 

ESCALLOPED FINNAN HADDIE 

1 cup flaked finnan haddie 

2 hard-cooked eggs (minced) 
1-3 cup bread crumbs 

1 cup milk 

2 tablespoonfuls fat 

2 tablespoonfuls butter 
Salt and pepper 



40 WARCOOKBOOK 

Make a cream sauce, melting the butter, stirring 
in flour, adding the milk and bringing to a boil. Place 
in the baking dish a layer of finnan haddie and a layer 
of egg until all are used up. Pour cream sauce over 
and cover with crumbs. Place in oven to heat through 
and brown the crumbs. 

The smoked bowfin carp may be prepared in the 
same way. 

FISH BALLS. 

1 cup salt codfish 

2 heaping cups potatoes 

1 egg 

y2 tablespoon fat 
Ys teaspoon pepper 
Wash fish in cold water and pick in very small 
pieces. Wash, pare and soak potatoes cutting in pieces 
of uniform size before measuring. Cook fish and po- 
tatoes in boiling water to cover until potatoes are soft. 
Drain thoroughly through strainer, return to kettle in 
which they were cooked and mash thoroughly ; add fat, 
egg, well-beaten, and pepper. Beat with a fork 2 min- 
utes. Add salt if necessary. Take up by spoonfuls, 
put in frying-basket and fry one minute in deep fat 

SCALLOPED FISH AND POTATOES. 

2 cups cooked fish (salt or fresh) 
2 cups mashed potatoes 

1^ cups skimmed milk 

1 tablespoon fat 

1 tablespoon cornstarch 
^ teaspoon salt 
j/i teaspoon pepper 

1 teaspoon chopped parsley 

1 teaspoon finely chopped onion 



WAR COOK BOOK 41 

Make a sauce, milk, fat, cornstarch, salt, pepper, 
parsley and onion, add to fish. Put into a baking dish 
and cover with mashed potatoes and bake until well 
browned. Garnish with hard-cooked egg and chopped 
parsley. 

FISH CHOWDER. 

2 pounds haddock or cod 
Slice salt pork 

Y-z onion 
4 potatoes 

3 pints cold water 
1 pint hot milk 

6 chowder crackers 
lYz teaspoons salt 
Pepper to taste 

Have head, skin and bones removed from fish at 
the market, and take these home with the fish. Cut fish 
in 1-inch pieces. Put head, skin and bones in a kettle 
with the cold water. Allow it to come slowly to the 
boiling point and then simmer ^ hour. Strain this 
water and return it to the kettle, throwing away the 
head, bones and skin. Cut the pork in small pieces, 
put in frying pan with the onion and fry until brown. 
Strain fat into kettle with the fish water and add the 
potatoes (washed, pared and cut up) . When these are 
nearly cooked, add the fish. Do not break the fish by 
stirring. Add hot milk, salt and pepper. Put the 
crackers in a soup dish and soften with a little cold 
milk before pouring in the hot chowder. Serve at once. 



42 WARCOOKBOOK 

CANNED FISH. 

SALMON LOAF. 

1 cup cooked hominy 
1 teaspoon salt 
Ys teaspoon pepper 
1 beaten egg 

1 cup cooked salmon 

Mix in order given, pack in greased mold and steam 
one hour. Turn on to platter, pour on a white sauce 
and garnish with hard-cooked eggs, olives and pars- 
ley. 

JELLIED FISH. 
^ cup cooked flaked fi^h 

2 tablespoons chopped capers and pimentos 
1 tablespoon granulated gelatin 

1 cup boiling water 

2 tablespoons lemon juice 
%. teaspoon salt 

2 tablespoons cold water 
Mix the fish and capers. Arrange in a mold. Soak 
the gelatin in 2 tablespoons of cold water. Add the 
boiling water and stir until the gelatin dissolves, then 
add the lemon juice and salt. Pour this jelly care- 
fully over the fish and set in a cool place to harden. 
Cut into portions and serve on lettuce with salad dres- 
sing. If desired, celery or hard boiled eggs cut in 
slices may be added to the fish. 

BAKED TUNA FISH. 

1 pound can tuna fish or salmon 

2 tablespoons oil 

1 tablespoon corn starch 
1 cup grated cheese ^ teaspoon salt 

1 cup skimmed milk Ys teaspoon paprika 



WARCOOKBOOK 43 

Flake the fish, make a sauce with the oil, corn- 
starch and milk, add cheese, salt and paprika. Ar- 
range alternate layers of fish and sauce in baking dish 
and bake 20 minutes. 



WHY WE USE POULTRY. 

In these days of conservation we must not overlook 
poultry of various kinds which may be used instead of 
meats. 

Poultry contains practically the same amount of 
nourishment, pound for pound, as beef, pork or mut- 
ton. It cannot be shipped as well, so will not be sent 
to our allies and soldiers. . 

Eat poultry. Make soup from the bones and tiny 
scraps. Make the meat go farther by combining it 
with rice, hominy, or vegetables, in scalloped dishes 
and stews. Fry out the fat from poultry and use it 
instead of lard and butter for shortening. French 
cooks consider poultry fat as a real delicacy in cookery. 



BUYING. 

In selecting poultry, see that the flesh is firm, that 
there is a fair amount of fat underneath the skin, that 
the skin is whole and of a clear yellow color, and that 
the odor is good. Chickens and fowls have certain 
characteristics which make them readily distinguish- 
able. Chickens have soft feet, a flexible breast bone, 
many pin feathers, and little fat, while fowls have 
hard scaly feet, a rigid breast bone, and long hairs 
over the body. 



44 WARCOOKBOOK 

POTATO STUFFING. 

2 cups hot mashed potatoes 
1>4 cups bread crumbs 

1 teaspoon sage 
1 chopped onion 

3 tablespoonfuls fat from fowl 
1 egg (if desired) 

1^ teaspoonfuls salt 

Clean and stuff fowl, place in roasting pan in mod- 
erate oven. Bake until tender and a knife inserted at 
the joint will show that it may be easily separated. 
For a tougher fowl, place in fireless cooker four hours 
to overnight, then stuff and brown in oven. 



WARCOOKBOOK 45 



Cream Soups 

CREAM OF CORN SOUP. 



1 can corn 

2 Clips boiling water 
2 cups milk 

1 sliced onion 

2 tablespoons butter substitute 
1 tablespoon flour substitute 

1 teaspoon salt 
paprika 
Add water to corn and simmer 20 minutes; rub 
through sieve. Scald milk with onion, remove onion 
and make a white sauce of the milk and remaining in- 
gredients. Add sauce to corn puree. 

CREAM OF SOY BEAN SOUP. 

1 tablespoon butter 

2 cups milk 

J^ onion minced or grated 
1 tablespoon flour 
1 cu^ cooked soy beans 
salt 
Melt butter, add flour, cook thoroughly, add milk 
and onions. Bring mixture to boiling point. Pass 
beans through sieve. Add beans and seasonings to 
milk and reheat. 

CREAM OF LIMA BEAN SOUP. 

1 cup dried lima beans 

3 pints cold water 4 slices carrots 

2 slices onion 1 cup milk 

1 tablespoon flour 1 teaspoon salt 

4 tablespoons butterine 



46 WARCOOKBOOK 

Soak beans over night ; in the morning, drain and 
add cold water ; cook until soft and rub through sieve. 
Cut vegetables in small cubes and cook 5 minutes in 
half of the fat. Remove vegetables, add flour, salt and 
pepper, and stir into boiling soup. Add milk, reheat, 
strain and add remaining fat. 

CREAM OF CELERY SOUP. 

3 cups hot water 

2 cups celery ends, roots and leaves 
Yi onion, sliced 

2 tablespoons cornstarch 

3 tablespoons fat 
Salt, pepper 

3 cups hot milk 

Cook celery and onion in water until tender, then 
rub through sieve. Make white sauce of remaining in- 
gredients and add celery water. 

CREAM OF TOMATO SOUP. 

Yz can or 2 cups tomatoes 
1 slice onion 
J4 teaspoon soda 

1 quart milk 

2 tablespoons cornstarch 
1 teaspoon salt 

Yz teaspoon pepper 

4 tablespoons fat 

Simmer tomato and onion together, 20 minutes, 
rub through sieve. Reheat tomato juice and add soda 
while hot. 

Make white sauce of remaining ingredients and 
add tomato juice. Serve at once. 



WARCOOKBOOK 47 

CREAM OF POTATO SOUP. 

2 potatoes 
4 cups milk 
Y2. onion 

2 tablespoons fat 
1 tablespoon chopped parsley 

1 tablespoon cornstarch 
Salt, paprika, pepper 

Cook potatoes in boiling salted water until soft, 
and put through a sieve. Scald milk with onion and 
remove onion. Make a sauce with hot milk and re- 
maining ingredients and combine with potato pulp. 
Add chopped parsley just before serving. 

VEGETABLE SOUP. 

2 bunches carrots and carrot tops 

1 potato (peelings and all) washed and 
chopped 

1 (13-oz.) can tomatoes or 1 can tomato soup 

2 bunches onions and onion tops 

Any left-overs or outside leaves of lettuce or 
cabbage 

3 quarts water 

Cook two hours. Strain through sieve. Cook one- 
half cup rice; strain and brown it; then add it and 
the rice water to soup and cook one-half hour more. 

BEAN SOUP. 

2 cups beans J^ tablespoon salt 

4 cups cold water ^ teaspoon pepper 

1 small onion ^ teaspoon mustard 

2 stalks celery, or 34 teaspoon celery salt 
Few grains cayenne 

^ tablespoon cornstarch 

3 tablespoons butter substitute 



48 WARCpOKBQOK 

Soak beans overnight; drain and add cold water. 
Slice onion and cook five minutes with half the fat and 
add to beans with celery cut in pieces. Simmer 3 or 
4 hours, or until beans are soft ; adding more water as 
water boils away. Eub through sieve, reheat to boil- 
ing point and add seasoning. Bind with remaining 
fat and cornstarch cooked together. 

LIMA BEAN SOUP. 

1 cup Lima beans 
4 cups water 

2 cups milk 

1 tablespoon fat 
J4 tablespoon cornstarch 
1 teaspoon salt 

Paprika 
1 slice onion 
Soak beans in cold water 10 to 12 hours. Cook in 
same water in which beans were soaked, with onion, 
until tender. Rub through sieve. Make a white sauce 
of remaining ingredients and add to bean puree. If 
soup is too thick, dilute wdth the bean water. 

SPLIT PEA SOUP. 

1 cup dried split peas 
2y^ quarts cold w^ater 
1 pint milk 
1 small sliced onion 

3 tablespoons drippings 
1 tablespoon cornstarch 

ly2 teaspoons salt 
Dash of pepper 
Pick over the peas carefully and let soak several 
hours, then drain, add the cold water. Simmer 3 



WARCOOKBOOK 49 

hours or until soft. Rub through a coarse sieve. Melt 
the drippings, add cornstarch seasoning and milk and 
stir until all is smooth, then add the pulp of the peas, 
let boil 1 or 2 minutes and serve hot. A ham bone 
may be added if desired for additional flavor. 

SOY BEAN SOUP. 



y^ pound ham hock ^ ounce salt pork 

5/6 cup soy beans 2 tablespoons onions 

y% pod red pepper i^ tablespoon salt 

4 cups, 1 quart, water ^^ teaspoon vinegar 

To 2 quarts extract made by boiling ham hock, salt 
pork and water add vegetables. Soy beans may be 
whole or run through sieve. Simmer until thoroughly 
cooked. 



VEGETABLE SOUP WITH SOY BEANS. 

1 pound meat bones 
1^4 tablespoons celery 

y^, pepper pod, red 
4 tablespoons tomato puree 
1^ teaspoons carrots 2^ tablespoons hominy 
iy2 teaspoons salt 1/7 onion 

lJ/2 teaspoons cabbage 1 quart water 
1 bay leaf 1 clove 

134 tablespoons turnips 

2 tablespoons soy beans uncooked 
13^ teaspoons parsley 

To 2 quarts meat extract made by boiling beans 
with water, add vegetables and simmer until thorough- 
ly cooked. 



50 WARCOOKBOOK 

EGGS 

DRIED EGGS. 

At the present prices, one hesitates to include, in a 
conservative cook book, recipes calling for eggs. How- 
ever, there is now available a product known as dessi- 
cated or dried eggs which may be used with very satis- 
factory results, both as to cost and as to the desirabil- 
ity of the foods prepared from the product. 

Dried eggs are manufactured on a large scale by 
several firms. The eggs are removed from the shell, 
yolks and whites mixed, and the water evaporated by 
heated air or by various mechanical devices. The re- 
sulting dry, granular mass is much more easily han- 
dled and shipped, occupies a much smaller space than 
eggs in the shell and is satisfactory in every way for 
use as food. It sells for 80 cents to $1.00 a pound, 
which makes the cost of eggs 25 to 31 cents a dozen. 
At this price it may be used extensively in the prepa- 
Gration of custards, quick breads and cakes, and may 
also be served alone as omelet or scrambled eggs in 
place of meat. 

The method of using dried egg is very simple. One 
lightly-rounded tablespoonful is the equivalent of one 
average-sized egg. This amount soaked for half an 
hour in three tablespoonfuls of water may be used in 
place of one egg. The egg will soften up more easily 
and be ready more quickly if stirred wdth a fork at 
intervals. 

Substituting on this basis, one may use dried eggs 
in any recipe for cakes, cookies, muffins, custards, 
cooked salad dressings, etc., in which the whites and 
yolks are not separated. 



WARCOOKBOOK 51 

EGGS— VAEIED WAYS TO COOK. 
PUFFY OMELETS. 

4 eggs 

^ teaspoon salt 
4 tablespoons hot water 

1 tablespoon butter 
pepper 

Add other flavors, if desired. 

Separate yolks from whites. To yolks add salt, 
pepper and hot water and beat until thick and lemon 
colored. 

Beat whites until stiff and fold into first mixture. 
Heat omelet pan, butter sides and bottom. Turn in 
mixture and cook slowly until puffed up and brown on 
the bottom. Place in oven to finish cooking the top. 
Fold and turn onto a hot platter. 

White sauce may be served with this or left-over- 
meat, fish, vegetable or cheese may be added before 
omelet is turned. Use heavy preserves for sweet ome- 
let. 

FRENCH OMELET. 

4 eggs 

4 tablespoons milk 
J^teasppon salt 
yi teaspoon pepper 

2 tablespoons butter 

Beat eggs slightly, just enough to blend yolks and 
whites, add milk and seasonings. Put butter in hot 
omelet pan, when melted turn in the mixture. As it 
cooks, prick and pick up with a fork until the whole 
is of cream consistency. Roll and turn on hot platter. 



52 WARCOOKBOOK 



CHEESE SOUFFLE. 



2 tablespoons butter 

2 tablespoons flour 
Yz cup milk 

J4 cup grated cheese 

3 eggs 
Cayenne pepper 

Yz teaspoon salt 
Make white sauce of butter, flour, milk and season- 
ings. Remove from fire, cool and stir in beaten ^^% 
yolks. Then fold in stiffly beaten whites. Pour into 
a buttered baking dish, place in pan of hot water, and 
bake 30 minutes in a moderate oven. Serve at once. 

SCRAMBLED EGGS. 

5 eggs 

^ cup milk 
I Yz teaspoon salt 

Yz teaspoon pepper 

2 tablespoons butter 

Beat eggs slightly with fork, add salt, pepper and 

milk. Heat omelet pan. Pour in butter and when 

melted turn in the mixture. Cook until of creamy 

consistency, stirring and scraping from bottom of pan. 

SCRAMBLED EGG WITH TOMATO SAUCE 

6 eggs 

1% cups tomatoes 
2 teaspoons sugar 

4 tablespoons butter 
1 slice onion 

Yi teaspoon salt 
Y^ teaspoon pepper 



WARCOOKBOOK 53 

Simmer tomatoes and sugar 5 minutes, fry butter 
and onions 3 minutes. Remove onion and add toma- 
toes, seasonings and eggs slightly beaten. Cook same 
as scrambled eggs. 

PLAIN OMELET. 
4 eggs 
yi cup water 
1 tablespoonful butter substitute 
salt 
pepper 

To the eggs, well beaten, add water, salt and pep- 
per. Put the fat in an omelet pan; when hot, pour 
in the mixture. As it cooks, prick and pick up with 
fork until the whole is of a creamy consistency. Brown, 
fold and serve on a hot platter. 

CHEESE OMELET. 

Make as directed for plain omelet. Just before 
folding, sprinkle over the top with grated cheese, al- 
low the cheese to melt slightly, fold and serve. 

BREAD OMELET. 

) 4 eggs 

^ cup milk 

^ cup stale bread crumbs 
1 tablespoon butter substitute 
salt 
pepper 

Soak bread crumbs in milk until soft, add to eggs 
well soaked and beaten. Add salt and pepper, cook 
and serve as directed for plain omelet. 



54 WARCOOKBOOK 

OMELETTE WITH MEAT OR VEGETABLES. 

Small amounts of left-over chicken, fish, ham or 
bacon may be cut finely and added to a plain omelet. 
Vegetables, such as peas, asparagus, potatoes or cauli- 
floAver, may also be used. 

A plain omelet may also be turned out on a plat- 
ter covered with seasoned cooked spinach. 

BAKED OR SHIRRED EGGS. 

Butter an egg-shirrer. Cover bottom and sides 
with fine cracker crumbs. Break an egg into a cup 
and carefully slip into shirrer. Cover with seasoned 
bread crumbs and bake in moderate oven until white 
is firm and crumbs brown. 

Eggs may be baked in small tomatoes. Cut in slice 
from stem end of tomato, scrape out the pulp, slip in 
an egg, sprinkle with salt and pepper, cover with but- 
tered crumbs, and bake. 

PRESERVING EGGS IN WATER-GLASS 
SOLUTION. 

During the spring and early summer, when eggs 
are abundant and reasonable in price, attention should 
be given to preserving them for winter use. Fresh 
eggs properly preserved may be kept for 8 to 12 
months in excellent condition and used with good re- 
sults. 

Eggs laid during April, May and early June have 
been found to keep better than those laid later in the 
season. 

If satisfactory results are to be obtained, the eggs 
should be fresh and clean, and if possible, infertile. 
Eggs that float when placed in the solution are not 



WARCOOKBOOK 55 

fresh and, therefore, can not be preserved. When an 
egg is only slightly soiled, a cloth dampened with 
vinegar can be used to remove such stains. Under no 
circumstances should badly soiled eggs be used for 
preserving; if put in the jar while dirty they will 
spoil, and washing removes a protective coating which 
prevents spoiling. 

WATER GLASS METHOD. 

A good method for the preservation of eggs is the 
use of sodium silicate, or water-glass. If the price of 
sodium silicate is about 30 cents a quart, eggs may be 
preserved at a cost of approximately 2 cents a dozen. 
It is not desirable to use the water-glass solution a sec- 
ond time. 

Use 1 quart of sodium silicate to 9 quarts of water 
that has been boiled and cooled. Place the mixture 
in a 5-gallon crock or jar. This will be sufficient to 
preserve 15 dozen eggs and will serve as a guide for 
the quantity needed to preserve larger numbers of 
eggs. 

(1) Select a 5-gallon crock and clean it thorough- 
ly, after which it should be scalded and allowed to dry. 

(2) Heat a quantity of water to the boiling point 
and allow it to cool. 

(3) When cool, measure out 9 quarts of water, 
place it in the crock, and add 1 quart of sodium sili- 
cate, stirring the mixture thoroughly. 

(4) The eggs should be placed in the solution. If 
sufficient eggs are not obtainable when the solution is 
first made, additional eggs may be added from time 
to time. Be very careful to allow at least two inches 
of the solution to cover the eggs at all times. 



56 WARCOOKBOOK 

(5) Place the crock containing the preserved eggs 
in a cool, dry place, well covered to present evapora- 
tion. Waxed paper covered over and tied around the 
top of the crock will answer this purpose. 

Vegetables, Cheese and Other 
Substitutes 

ITALIAN RICE. 

1 cup dry rice 

2 tablespoons olive oil 
^ cup chopped onion 

3^ cups canned tomatoes 
Yi cup green peppers (chopped) 

1 teaspoon salt 

yi teaspoon pepper 

Fry chopped onion in olive oil until golden brown. 
Add dry rice and brown slightly. Add canned tomato, 
chopped pepper and seasonings. Cover and simmer 
slowly, stirring as little as possible, for about 45 min- 
utes until the rice is tender. 

RISOTTO. 

2 cups rice 

1 sweet pepper minced 

3 tablespoons butter 
1 small onion, minced 

Y2. cup grated cheese 
3 stems celery, minced 
1 cup tomato pulp or puree 
1 teaspoon salt 
3 drops tobasco 



WARCOOKBOOK 57 

Boil celery and pepper in 2 quarts of water for 20 
minutes. Add washed rice and boil 15 minutes longer. 
While rice is boiling, place butter in skillet. Add 
onion, cook to a light brown. Add rice, cook 2 min- 
utes, stirring constantly with a fork. Add water in 
which rice w^as boiled, tomato pulp, salt, pepper and 
tobasco. Cook slowly, 20 minutes, or until liquid is 
absorbed. Add grated cheese, cook slowly until it 
melts. Serve hot in a hot dish. 

ENGLISH MONKEY. 

Soak 1 cup stale bread crumbs broken fine but not 
rolled in 1 cup milk, 15 minutes. Melt in double boiler 
1 tablespoon butter and ^ cup soft cheese cut in small 
pieces. When cheese has melted, add soaked crumbs, 
1 egg slightly beaten, y^ teaspoon salt and a few grains 
of cayenne pepper. Cook 3 minutes and pour over 
toast or toasted crackers. 

CHEESE AND NUT ROAST. 

1 cup cheese 

1 cup ^English walnuts 

1 cup bread crumbs 

2 tablespoons chopped onion 
1 tablespoon butter 

juice of half of lemon 
salt and pepper 

Cook the onion in the butter or other fat and a 
little water until tender. Mix the other ingi'edients 
and moisten with the water in which the onion has 
been cooked. Pour into a shallow dish and brown in 
the oven. 



58 WARCOOKBOOK 

LIMA BEAN LOAF. 

1 cup dried Lima beans 

1 onion 

1 carrot 

1 cup rice 

1 teaspoon salt 

1 egg, slightly beaten 

3 tablespoons oil 
}i teaspoon mustard 
^ cup boiling water 

1 tablespoon catsup 

Soak beans over night in cold water ; drain ; cover 
with boiling water, add onion, carrot, rice and cook 
until beans are tender. Drain, retain water for soup 
stock. Put bean mixture through meat chopper ; add 
remaining ingredients, mix well, pack in greased bread 
pan and bake a half hour. 

BEAN ROAST. 

2 cups cooked pink beans 
}i pound cheese 

5 canned pimentos 
1^4 cups bread crumbs 

1 teaspoon salt 
y2 cup white sauce 

Put cheese, beans and pimentos through a meat 
chopper. Mix all the ingredients together. Place in 
an oiled baking dish and bake slowly twenty minutes. 



WARCOOKBOOK 59 

BAKED SOY BEANS. 

2 cups soy beans 
2 cups cold water 

1 teaspoon soda 

2 cups hot water 

1 1-3 tablespoons vinegar 
2 cups boiling water 

1 or 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce 

2 tablespoons molasses 
2 teaspoons salt 

1 small onion 
1 pod red pepper 
yi lb. salt pork cut in cubes of 1 inch 
1 cup water 

Soak the beans in 2 cups cold water over night. 
To this add 2 cups hot water containing the soda and 
bring to a boil and cook for 1 hour. This will soften 
the cooking of the beans. Pour the water off and add 
2 cups boiling water and the vinegar and boil briskly 
1 hour. Transfer the beans to a bean pot. Add cup 
of water and the Worcestershire sauce, molasses, salt, 
onion, pepper and pork. Place in slow oven and bake. 



CURRY OF KIDNEY BEANS. 

2 cups kidney beans 

2 cloves 

2 cups tomato 

1 onion minced 

1 teaspoon curry powder 

1 teaspoon salt 

2 tablespoons butter and drippings 
1 tablespoon flour 



60 WARCOOKBOOK 

Wash and soak beans over night. Drain, cover 
with water, boil 30 minutes. Drain again. Cover with 
boiling water, boil gently 3 hours or until tender. 
Make tomato sauce of butter, onions, flour, curry pow- 
der, cloves, pour sauce over beans. Simmer ten min- 
utes. Serve hot. 

NUT CROQUETTES. 

1 cup minced peanuts 

1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce 

1 teaspoon scraped onion 

1 cup rolled oats, cooked 

1 tablespoon butter 

1 teaspoon salt 

1 egg 

1 cup crumbs 

Mince peanuts in grinder or with rolling pin. Stir 
nuts into rolled oats and butter melted, onion, salt. 
Worcestershire sauce, egg, mix thoroughly. Stir in 
one-half of crumbs. Shape into cylindrical croquettes. 
Roll in remaining crumbs. Fry from 1 to 2 minutes in 
hot fat. This recipe makes 10 croquettes, each weigh- 
ing 2 ounces. Serve with or without white sauce. This 
recipe admits of many variations and is an excellent 
way of using rolled oats. Any other nuts for peanuts. 
The mixture may be cooked in a baking dish or shaped 
into patties and baked in the oven. 

GREEN PEPPERS AU GRATIN 

3 green peppers 

%. cup bread crumbs 

}i cup grated cheese 

1^ teaspoons chopped onion 

1^ teaspoons olive oil 



WARCOOKBOOK 61 

Koast peppers whole on a hot pan. Remove seeds 
and skins ; cut into strips. Into a greased baking dish 
put alternate layers of pepper and bread crumbs, 
sprinkling each layer with cheese. Add olive oil and 
chopped onion. Brown in oven. 

SOY BEAN CROQUETTES. 

1 cup cooked beans 
y2 cup milk 
y^ teaspoon salt 
onion to taste 
J4 to ^ cup bread crumbs 
1 tablespoon butter 
1 tablespoon flour 
Chopped parsley 
Melt butter in top of double boiler, add flour, thor- 
oughh^ mix. Heat, add milk and onion, cook over hot 
water until it thickens, add salt. Rub beans through 
a sieve, add crumbs, mix thoroughly with w^hite sauce. 
Dip in w^hite of eggs, then in bread crumbs, fry in hot 
fat. Makes 7 medium sized croquettes. 

SOY BEAN LOAF. 

1 cup cooked soj^ beans 

2 tablespoons bread crumbs 

^ teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 
y^ pound cheese 
^ lemon (juice) 
1^ tablespoons onions 
salt, pepper 
Boil beans as for Baked Soy Beans, grate cheese, 
mix with beans, moisten with soup stock, if you have 
it, if not, white sauce. Add bread crumbs until stiff 



62 WARCOOKBOOK 

enough to form into a loaf. Bake in a moderate oven, 
basting frequently with water, 1 tablespoon butter 
melted in it and 1 tablespoon lemon juice. 

CAULIFLOWER WITH CHEESE SAUCE. 

Eemove leaves, cut off stalk and soak thirty min- 
utes (head down) in cold water to cover. Cook (head 
up) twenty minutes, or until soft, in boiling salted 
water; drain; separate flowerets and reheat in sauce. 

CHEESE SAUCE. 

yi cup grated cheese 
yi teaspoon soda 
3 tablespoons oleomargarine 
3 tablespoons flour 
1^ cups milk 
^ teaspoon salt 

Few grains pepper 
Melt oleomargarine, add flour mixed with salt and 
pepper. Stir until thoroughly blended. Pour on milk 
gradually, stirring until well mixed, then beating until 
smooth and glossy. Then add cheese mixed with soda. 
Stir until cheese is blended with sauce. 

Cabbage or celery may be served in the same way. 
Shred cabbage as for slaw. Soak until crisp in cold 
water, drain and cook 10 minutes in boiling salted wa- 
ter. Drain and pour over it cheese sauce. 

If liked, one may cover the top with crumbs and 
bake until crumbs are brown. 

Celery should be washed, scraped and cut in half- 
inch pieces. Cook in boiling salted water until soft 
(about half an hour.) Drain and add cheese sauce. 
This also may be covered with crumbs and baked till 
crumbs are brown. 



WARCOOKBOOK 63 

BAKED HOMINY AND CHEESE. 

1 tablespoon oleomargarine or drippings 
1 tablespoon cornstarch 
1 cup milk 

1 teaspoon salt 

Yz teaspoon paprika 

Yz cup to 1 cup cheese grated or cut fine 

2 cups cooked hominy 
34 cup bread crumbs 

Make a sauce of fat, cornstarch, salt and milk. Add 
the cheese and paprika to the sauce. Arrange the 
hominy in baking dish and pour the sauce over it. 
Cover with crumbs and bake 20 minutes in a moderate 
oven. 



64 WARCOOKBOOK 



Fats 



FATS ARE DOUBLY PRECIOUS. 

Fats supply energy. When people go hungry they 
draw on the fats of their bodies. When that is gone, 
they are an easy prej^ to disease. Some fats have stuff 
;in them for growth. Without fats, people weaken and 
waste away. 

/ Our armies use fat by shipload. Glycerin, which 
comes from FAT, is one of the chief things for making 
modern explosives. We must have fats to keep up the 
Ifight. 

HOW TO SAVE FATS. 

1. Cut down in the amount of fat used in the prepa- 

ration of foods. 

2. Train the members of the family to leave no fat on 

their plates. This means fat from meat as well 
as butter. 

3. Substitute vegetable fats and oils for animal fats. 

4. Omit fried foods. 

5. Use all drippings from meat as seasonings. 

6. Use rinds of bacon and salt pork as seasonings for 
V cabbage, greens, vegetables or soups. 

7. Keep a jar for all trimmings from meat, bits of fat 

or drippings. When sufficient amount has col- 
lected, render the contents. 

8. Use butter on the table, especially for children. Do 

not use it in cooking. In recipes calling for but- 
ter, any of the following substitutions may be 
made: 



WARCOOKBOOK 65 

One cup butter equivalent to : 
1 cup (scant) oleomargarine 
4-5 cup lard substitute 
4-5 cup rendered poultry fat 
4-5 cup rendered suet or mutton fat 
4-5 cup vegetable fat or oil 
The following suggestions will help to save fats in 
cooking : 

MEATS. 
Roast or broil instead of frying. Use meat loaf 
instead of croquettes. When meat is boiled, skim off 
excess fat for other cooking and use liquid for soup. 
When meat or poultry is roasted, much of the fat 
may be used for other cooking. The gravy need not 
be so rich. Trim oiT excess of fat on all meats before 
cooking, render and use. 

BREADS. 

Use clarified fats, fat compounds, vegetable fats 
and oils. All fat may be omitted if desired. 

CAKES. 
Serve only plain cakes. Use clarified fats, chicken 
fat, vegetable fats or oils, fat compounds. 

PIES. 

Serve only plain pastry. 

Serve pies with one crust instead of two. 

Use vegetable fats or fat compounds in pastry. 
Vegetable oils may be used if the quantity is lessened 
one-third. 

CARE OF FATS. 

All fats which are to be stored for some time 
should be protected from heat, light and air to pre- 
vent them from becoming rancid. Keep in tightly 
covered receptacles and in a cool, dark place. 



66 WARCOOKBOOK 

In summer time scraps of fat which are saved 
should be rendered promptly to prevent them from 
becoming rancid. It is also important in rendering 
or clarifying fats that all moisture be driven off since 
molds are very apt to grow if fats contain moisture. 

Keep butter, oleomargarine and other butter sub- 
stitutes in a cool place away from foods having strong 
odors, since odors are readily absorbed by these fats. 
Store the oils in closed cans or bottles, w^rapped in 
paper, in a cool place. The refrigerator is preferable. 

HOME MADE FAT COMPOUND. 

Mix one part of oil (cottonseed oil or corn oil, etc.) 
with two parts of warm rendered suet. Stir several 
times while cooling to prevent the ingredients from 
separating. This makes a good and satisfactory com- 
pound with a texture similar to lard, but at a lower 
cost per pound. In summer, suet may be added to 
lard in small amounts in order to have a harder fat. 
If milk is added to suet before rendering the flavor is 
improved. 

HOW TO KENDER FATS. 

Chop in small pieces or put through a meat chop- 
per, heat in a double boiler until all the fat has melted. 
The use of a double boiler prevents too high a tempera- 
ture. If fat is overheated, it will become rancid. 
Strain through a cloth, heat again to sterilize and drive 
lOff moisture. 

HOW TO CLARIFY FATS. 

Method 1. Melt the fat with an equal proportion 
of water in a double boiler. Strain through a cloth. 
When cold, remove the layer of fat from the water 
and reheat to drive off moisture. 



WARCOOKBOOK 67 

Method 2. Follow directions in Method 1, using 
sour milk. Flavors and odors are modified. 

Method 3. Follow directions given in Method 1, 
adding several pieces of clean hardwood charcoal. If 
beef fat is being clarified, the yellow color is removed 
and a Avhite odorless fat is secured. 

HOW TO MAKE SAVORY FATS. 

Savory fats may be made when undesirable flavors 
are to be eliminated. Usually strong seasonings, such 
as thyme, sage, marjoram, summer savory, bay leaves 
or onions are added to unrendered fats, having pro- 
nounced odors or flavors like those of beef or mutton. 
These seasonings mask the strong original flavors. 
Render in a double boiler and strain carefully through 
a flannel cloth so that all bits of herbs are removed. 
Adding salt after rendering improves the flavor. 

Savory fats may also be prepared from rendered 
fats by adding the seasonings, heating the mixture and 
straining. 

SALAD DRESSING. 

The essential ingredients of any dressing are fat 
and acid. The fat may be any oil, butter substitute, 
cream, chicken or bacon fat. The acid may be vine- 
gar or lemon juice or a combination of fruit juices 
with lemon predominating. Vinegar makes a stronger 
dressing, the fruit juice a more delicate one. Often 
when pineapple is used in a salad the juice is wasted. 
This may be acidified with lemon juice and used as 
the liquid in cooked dressing to be served with the 
fruit salad. 

There are three types of salad dressing — French, 
mayonnaise and cooked dressing. The simplest type of 



68 WARCOOKBOOK 

dressing is the French, which is made up of the two 
essential ingredients, fat and acid, simply mixed and 
well seasoned. Mayonnaise is made of these same in- 
gredients with either egg white or egg yolks added. 
Instead of the olive oil usually called for, any of the 
commercial vegetable oils, such as cottonseed or corn 
oil, may be substituted. They are less expensive than 
the olive oil and have the same food value. If the 
olive flavor is preferred use part olive oil and part 
substitute. 

There are two kinds of cooked dressing, one made 
from a custard foundation, the other with a cream 
sauce basis. The second one is the more economical, 
especially when eggs are expensive. Where sugar is 
used, equal amounts of honey or twice as much corn 
syrup may be substituted. 



WARCOOKBOOK 69 

SALAD DRESSINGS 

FRENCH DRESSING. 

2 tablespoons vinegar or lemon juice 

4 tablespoons oil 

Yz teaspoon salt 

y^ teaspoon paprika 

Add seasonings to the oil, then beat in the vinegar 
or lemon juice, adding it a little at a time. French 
dressing may be made in quantities by placing the in- 
gredients in a bottle and shaking well. Although the 
dressing separates in standing it may be combined 
.again by shaking thoroughly each time just before 

serving. 

« 

MAYONNAISE 

1 ^%^ yolk 

1 cup oil 

1 tablespoon lemon juice or vinegar 

1 teaspoon salt 

Yz teaspoon paprika 

Method 1. Beat egg yolk, add seasonings, then the 
lemon juice or vinegar, and mix thoroughly. Into this 
mixture drop the oil slowly, at first beating constant- 
ly. When it begins to thicken, the oil may be added 
more rapidly. If too thick, then with the lemon juice 
or vinegar. 

Method 2. If all the ingredients are thoroughly 
chilled, the egg, seasoning, acid and oil may be put 
together in a bowl and combined by beating with a 
dover beater. This saves time and a good dressing 
results. 



70 WARCOOKBOOK 

COOKED DRESSING (Custard Foundation). 

4 whole eggs or 8 yolks 
2 tablespoons sugar or honey, or 
4 tablespoons corn syrup 
1 cup vinegar or fruit juice 
Yz teaspoon salt 

Heat the liquid in the top part of a double boiler 
and pour slowly into the beaten eggs. Add season- 
ings and cook the mixture over water till thick. When 
cool, thin with either plain or whipped cream or beat- 
en ^^^ white. This dressing is especially good for 
fruit salads. This will make one pint. 



COOKED DRESSING (White Sauce Basis). 

2 tablespoons flour 1 whole egg or two yolks 

1 tablespoon fat 1 teaspoon salt 

Yz cup water mustard 

Yz cup vinegar paprika 

Yz tablespoonful sugar or syrup 

Melt the fat and stir in the flour. Add water slow- 
ly, stirring constantly. Cook directly over fire until 
it thickens. Then add vinegar and cook quickly until 
very thick. Remove from fire and add beaten ^^'g. 
The fat may be omitted especially if the two ^%g yolks 
are used, since two egg yolks contain 4-5 tablespoon of 
fat. This dressing is especially good for meats and 
vegetables. It will keep indefinitely. When used, 
thicken with sweet or sour cream or beaten egg whites. 
This will make % pint. 



WARCOOKBOOK 71 

SAUCE TARTARS. 
Yi teaspoon mustard 
Yz teaspoon salt 

few grains cayenne 
2 egg yolks 
Xy-i tablespoons vinegar 
Yz cup oil 

Yi tablespoon finely chopped capers 
Yi tablespoonful finely chopped pickles 
Y2 tablespoon finely chopped olives 
Y2 tablespoon finely chopped parsley 
Y2 tablespoon finely chopped chives 
Mix mustard, salt and cayenne, add ^^^ yolks and 
when well mixed, add Y'^ tablespoon vinegar. Add oil 
gradually and as mixture thickens add the remainder 
of the vinegar. When ready to serve add the re- 
maining ingredients. 

RUSSIAN DRESSING. 

1 tablespoon Brand's A-1 sauce 
or Worcestershire sauce 

2 tablespoons chili sauce 
Yi cup mayonnaise 

juice of ^ lemon 
Squeeze lemon on cold plate. Add chili sauce and 
Brand's sauce. Mix thoroughly and add mayonnaise. 
Chopped olives, pickles, peppers or chives may be 
added. 

THOUSAND ISLAND DRESSING, 
1 cup Mayonnaise Y^ cup chili sauce 

Yat cup French dressing 2 pimentos 
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce 
chives or onion 
Chop pimentos and chives and combine ingredients 
just before serving. 



72 WARCOOKBOOK 

WHY WE MUST SAVE SUGAR 

During the canning season you were told to use 
sugar for preserving because by eating preserves we 
save fats. Otherwise— SAVE SUGAR. 

Instead of four ounces a day, use not more than 
two. That is more than folks have in Europe. Save 
at least an ounce of sugar a day. 

Give the children syrup, honey, molasses, preserves. 
It is better for them than candy. Munch raisins if 
you crave sweets. Go light on sugar in tea and coffee. 
Don't leave any in the bottom of the cup. Stint your- 
self on sweet drinks. Eat your cake without frosting. 

Nibbling sweets to tickle the palate never did any- 
one any good. Too much makes a body logy. And 
now, that sugar is wanted to win the war, it is a sin 
to use any for mere indulgence. 

One ounce a day — that 's all it takes to make a stock 
of 1,185,000 tons this year for our Army and our Al- 
lies. Saving that ounce a day is part of YOUR WAR 
SERVICE. 

Cut out candy. 

Use less sugar in tea and coffee and substj tute other 
sweetening wherever possible. 

Try cooking breakfast cereals with chopped tigs, 
dates or raisins. You will not need to add any sugar 
at the table. 

Use molasses, honey, corn or other syrups for 
sweetening. 

Use fresh fruits for desserts in place of rich pas- 
tries and sweet puddings. 

Bake apples or pears with a little Avater for several 
hours until a rich syrup forms. 

If more sweetening is desired, add a little honey or 
molasses. 



WARCOOKBOOK 73 

Stew dried prunes in the water in which they were 
soaked until the liquid is almost boiled away. 

If more juice is wanted, add water to the syrup. 

Do not use frosting unless you can make it with- 
out sugar. 

Sugarless Sweets 

CANDIES. 

Raisin, Nut and Honey Bars 
2 cups raisins 1 cup nuts 

}i cup honey 
Run raisins and nuts through meat chopper, add 
honey and mix thoroughly. Place in dish under 
weight for 24 hours. Cut in bars, or this can be used 
to stuff dates, figs or dipped in chocolate. 

WAR SWEETS. 
1 pound figs 
1 pound dates 
1 pound English walnuts, or any other nuts 
confectioner 's sugar 
Run through the meat chopper, work on board 
dredged with sugar until well blended. Roll % inch 
thickness, shape with fancy cutters. Brush with pow- 
dered sugar. Pack in boxes between layers of oiled 
paper. This may also be used as center for chocolate. 
One-half teaspoon orange juice may be added to flavor, 

STUFFED DATES. 

Soak one pound of dates in water, stone and fill 
with pecan kernels or English Walnuts, or a combina- 
tion of nuts broken in pieces. Roll in powdered or 
granulated sugar. 



74 WARCOOKBOOK 

STUFFED FIGS. 

Split down one side of figs, fill with chopped nuts, 
press together well, steam until plump. When they 
begin to cool, roll in granulated sugar if you choose. 

CHOCOLATE-COATED NUTS. 

Half a cake of chocolate, half teaspoon oleomargar- 
ine. Melt over hot water, dip nut kernels and put on 
greased paper to cool. 

DRIED FEUIT BALLS. 

Wash one cup dried apricots and soak for 6 hours. 
Dry them on clean cloth and put through food chop- 
per with 1 cup each of figs, dates and seeded raisins. 
Add half as much chopped nuts and ^^ teaspoon of 
vanilla. Mix well, pai?k in greased mold and let 
stand in cool place over night. 

Roll in balls and toss in chopped cocoanut or dip 
in melted chocolate. 

CANDY— USING SMALL PORTION OF SUGAR. 
GLACE NUTS. 

Yi pound nuts 

34 cup water 

y-z cup sugar 

yi cup karo syrup 

y^ teaspoon cream tartar 
Boil until the color changes, then put into pan of 
cold water to stop boiling, then in pan of hot water 
while dipping the nuts. Dip nuts in syrup using a 
long pin or fork and place on buttered dish or oil 
paper. 



WARCOOKBOOK 75 

CHEAP BUTTER SCOTCH. 

1 cup light brown sugar 
yi cup vinegar 

1 tablespoon oleomargarine 

Boil sugar and vinegar until it cracks, then add 
the butter and pour into a buttered pan to cool. Mark 
in squares before it is cooled. 

CHOCOLATE CARAMELS. 

2y2 tablespoons oleomargarine 
^ cup milk 

2 cups molasses 

3 squares chocolate 

1 cup light brown sugar 

1 teaspoon vanilla 

. Put the butter into a kettle, and when melted add 
molasses, sugar and milk and stir until the sugar is 
dissolved. When boiling point is reached, add the 
chocolate. Boil until when tried in cold water a firm 
ball may form. Add the vanilla just after taking from 
fire and pour into a buttered pan to cool and mark 
into squares. 

HONEY NOUGAT. 

^ cup honey 

y2 cup brown sugar 

2 whites of eggs 

1 pound almonds or other nuts 
Boil honey and sugar together until drops will hold 
their shape when poured into cold water. Add the 
whites of the eggs, well-beaten, and cool very slowly, 
stirring constantly until the mixture becomes brittle 
when dropped into water. Add the almonds and cool 
under a weight. The candy can be broken into pieces 
or may be cut and wrapped in oiled paper. 



76 WARCOOKBOOK 

SAUCES 

LEMON SAUCE. 

^ cup sugar 

yi cup corn syrup (light) 

1 cup boiling water 

1 tablespoon corn starch 

1 tablespoon oleomargarine 
y^ teaspoon salt 

2 tablespoons lemon juice 
}4 grated rind of lemon 
^ teaspoon nutmeg 

Mix sugar, salt and cornstarch. Add water grad- 
ually, stirring constantly ; add syrup. Boil 5 minutes ; 
remove from fire; add oleomargarine, nutmeg, lemon 
juice and grated lemon rind 

FRUIT SAUCE. 

yi cup sugar 

yi cup corn syrup (light) 

y^ cup fruit juice 

J4 cup boiling water 

1 tablespoon cornstarch 
%. teaspoon salt 

2 tablespoons lemon juice 
34 grated lemon rind 

y^ teaspoon cinnamon 

y% teaspoon ginger 

}4 tablespoon oleomargarine 
Mix, sugar, salt, and cornstarch. Add water grad- 
ually, stirring constantly. Add syrup. Boil 5 min- 
utes ; remove from fire ; add oleomargarine, spice, lem- 
on juice, and grated rind. Any fruit juice or a mix- 
ture of fruit juices from canned fruit may be used. 
Prune juice, pear juice and gooseberry juice, all make 
good sauces. 



WARCOOKBOOK 77 

HOT CHOCOLATE SAUCE. 

1 square unsweetened chocolate 
Yz cup boiling water 
3/2 cup corn syrup (light) 
Yt. cup sugar (brown) 
1 tablespoon oleomargarine 
Yi teaspoon vanilla 
Melt chocolate over hot water, add oleomargarine, 
and blend thoroughly. While constantly stirring, add 
the boiling water gradually, add sugar and syrup. 
Boil for about 12 minutes. Cool slightly and flavor 
with vanilla. Keep warm over hot water until ready 
to serve. 

OLD FASHIONED PUDDING SAUCE. 

1 cup corn syrup 

1 cup water 

2 tablespoons cornstarch 
4 tablespoons lemon juice 

Mix the cornstarch with small amount of water. 
Mix the syrup and water, add cornstarch gradually 
and cook until thickened. Add flavoring and serve 
on pudding. 



78 WARCOOKBOOK 

MARMALADES AND JELLIES 

CARROT MARMALADE. 

2 cups ground carrot 
1^ cups corn syrup or honey 
2 lemons 
2 teaspoons ground ginger root 

Cook carrot until tender. Add the sugar and lem- 
ons, quartered and cut in thin slices. Cook slowly un- 
til thick. Do not stir. Pack in hot jars and sterilize. 
The ginger root may be omitted if desired. 

MOCK ORANGE. 

2 cups ground carrot 

2 lemons (juice) 

1 orange (juice and grated rind) 

1 cup corn syrup or honey 

Cook carrot until tender. Add the lemon and 
orange and cook slowly until thick. Do not stir. Pack 
in hot jars and sterilize. 

CARROT AND PINEAPPLE. 

1 cup ground carrot 
1 cup pilneapple 
1 cup corn syrup or honey 
1 lemon 

Shred the pineapple and cook until tender. Add 
lemon, quartered and sliced very thin. Boil ingredi- 
ents slowly until thick. Do not stir. Pack in hot jars 
and sterilize. 



WARCOOKBOOK 79 

PEACH CONSERVE. 

1 can peaches 

1 lemon 

1 orange 
y2 cup corn syrup 

1 cup raisins • 

1 cup walnut meats 
Cook the thickly sliced outer skin of the lemon 
^nd orange in the peach syrup until tender, then add 
the peaches sliced, the walnuts cut in pieces, and also 
the raisins. Cook until of desired consistency. 

FRESH FRUIT JAM. 

1 cup raisins 
1^ cups peeled apples 
Y2. cup figs or raspberries 
1 cup syrup 
Run fruit through meat chopper. Cook 30 min- 
utes until a paste is formed. Used for sweet sand- 
wiches and pie filling. 

JELLY (Made with Karo). 

1 cup fruit juice 
1 cup Karo (white) 

Wash such fruit as berries, grapes and currants in 
running water and add 1 cup of water for each pound 
of fruit. For apples, quinces, guavas and such hard 
fruits wash, slice and add 3 cups water to each pound 
of fruit. Cook fruit until tender. Squeeze through 
a cheese cloth, then allow to drip without pressure 
through a flannel jelly bag. After cooking the juice 
to same temperature, test it to determine the amount 



80 WARCOOKBOOK 

of pectin present. This test gives some idea of the 
proper proportions of sugar to juice. Add 1 table- 
spoon 95% grain alcohol to 1 tablespoon of juice and 
shake gently. The effect of the alcohol is to bring to- 
gether the pectin in a jelly-like mass. If a large quan- 
tity of pectin is present it will appear in one mass or 
iclot. This indicates that equal quantities of sja^up 
and juice may be used. If the pectin does not slip 
from glass in one mass, less syrup will be required. A 
fair proportion is ^ cup sugar to 1 cup juice. 

Cook juice in small quantities adding syrup at the 
beginning. No exact temperature can be given for the 
jellying point, because it varies with different fruits. 
The most convenient means of determining when it is 
iinished is to test with a spoon or paddle. When the 
jellying point is reached, it will break from the spoon 
I in flakes or sheets. When this jelly stage is reached, 
remove from the fire immediately and skim. Skim- 
ming at this point saves waste. After skimming the 
jelly, pour at once into hot sterilized glasses and set 
aside to cool. 



JAM MADE WITH KARO. 

Follow usual method for making jam, substituting 
karo for sugar. Use 1 cup fruit to 1 cup karo. 



WARCOOKBOOK 81 

Vegetables 

CREAMED VEGETABLES. 

Use potatoes, turnips, celery, onions, cabbage, cauli- 
flower, beets, parsnips, salsify, Brussels sprouts, car- 
rots, etc. Make a white sauce, using equal portions fat 
and flour — one to two tablespoons to one cup hot milk ; 
melt fat, stir flour into it till it makes a smooth paste, 
add hot milk and salt and pepper to taste, and stir 
constantly until it thickens. 

One-lialf as ynucli cornstarch may he used for tJiick- 
ening instead of flour. 

SALTED CORN. 

Take corn that has been boiled 5 minutes and then 
salted out of water and soak until fresh. If still salty 
when ready to cook, boil and then pour off the water. 

Cook in fresh w^ater until tender and season to 
taste. 

SCALLOPED VEGETABLES. 

Put any creamed vegetable into greased baking 
dish, cover top with buttered crumbs, and brown in 
JDven. Grated cheese may be added to the white sauce 
and used with vegetables which do not have a strong 
flavor. 

SCALLOPED CORN. 

2 cups or 1 can corn 2 tablespoons fat 

1 teaspoon salt ^ cup crumbs 

1 cup milk 1 tablespoon fat 
J4 teaspoon pepper speck of salt 

Mix the corn, milk, seasonings and the melted fat. 
'Place in greased baking dish with buttered crumbs 



82 WARCOOKBOOK 

over top and bake in moderate oven until crumbs are 
brown. To prepare crumbs, melt butter substitute, stir 
the crumbs into it and add salt. 

SCALLOPED POTATOES. 

Remove the skin from boiled potatoes and cut in 
slices y^ inch thick. Arrange the sliced potatoes in 
layers in a buttered baking dish, covering each layer 
with white sauce. Sprinkle the top with buttered 
crumbs, and bake for about twenty minutes. 

Variations: Add in layers — 

Hard-cooked eggs, sliced 
Grated cheese Fish, beef, etc. 

SCALLOPED POTATOES. 

Wash, pare and cut 4 potatoes in ^ slices. Put in 
a layer in buttered baking dish, sprinkle with salt 
and pepper, dredge with flour, and dot over with ^ 
tablespoon oleomargarine ; repeat. Add hot milk until 
it may be seen through to the top layer. Bake 1^ 
hours or until potato is soft. 

Slices of bacon ends or freshened salt pork may 
be added to top of potato if the amount of butter is 
lessened. 
Variations — 

Cut cooked potatoes in dice of uniform size ; sea- 
son with salt, pepper, butter. Sprinkle with 
chopped parsley. 

Cut cooked potatoes into cubes or slices. Add 
white sauce. Cheese may be added to this white 
sauce. 

Put creamed potatoes into a l)uttered baking dish. 
Cover the top with buttered bread crumbs. Bake 
until brown. 



IWARCOOKBOOK 83 

Arrange alternate layers of creamed potatoes and 
grated cheese in a buttered baking dish. Cover 
the top of the dish. 

BELGIAN BAKED POTATOES. 

Wash, pare and cut in pieces as for French fried 
potatoes. Lay potatoes on an oiled pan, season with 
salt and pepper and bake in a fairly hot oven until 
puffed, golden brown and mealy. 

POTATOES A LA GOLDENROD. 

Cut 2 cups boiled potatoes into cubes. Separate 
yolks from whites of four hard boiled eggs. Chop the 
whites and force the yolks through a potato ricer or 
strainer. Add potato. Add white sauce. Serve on 
toast if desired. 

SWEET POTATOES AND APPLES. 

Boil sweet potatoes as directed ; slice the long way 
of the potato. Make alternate layers of sliced apples 
and sweet potatoes, sprinkling 2 tablespoons of brown 
sugar and 1 teaspoon butter; cut in small pieces on 
each layer. Pour over this, when the pan is filled, ^ 
cup water, and bake until apples are done, and the 
top is a delicate brown. 

CORN FRITTERS. 

1 can corn 2 eggs 

1 cup flour yi teaspoon paprika 

2 teaspoons salt 1 teaspoon baking powder 

Chop corn and add to dry ingredients mixed and 
sifted, then add q^^ yolks well-beaten and fold in the 
whites, beaten stiff. Saute in lard substitute and 
drain on paper. 



84 WARCOOKBOOK 

MASHED BEANS. 

1 cup dried beans 

2 tablespoons chopped onion 
1 tablespoon chopped parsley 
1 tablespoon fat 

Yz teaspoon salt 
Yz teaspoon pepper 

Pick over beans and wash them; then soak over 
night. Cook in water soaked until tender. Drain, 
mash beans. Add seasonings and chopped parsley. 
Brown onion, finely chopped, in fat. Add to mashed 
beans. Heat and serve. The mashed beans may be 
cooled, the onion added raw, and the dish served with 
French dressing as a salad. 

STUFFED TOMATO. 

Cut a slice from end of medium tomato. Remove 
seeds. Stuff with 1 cup boiled rice cut fine, 1 cup 
grated cheese, 1 tablespoon melted oleomargarine, pap- 
rika, sprinkled with bread crumbs and bake. 

NUT SURPRISE. 

Parboil six medium onions in salt water. Hollow 
out centers of onions, chop centers and mix with one 
cup of ground nuts, one-half cup bread crumbs, and 
one-half cup standard cream sauce. Fill onions with 
this mixture, cover with buttered bread crumbs and 
let brown in oven. 



WARCOOKBOOK 85 

STUFT^ED CABBAGE. 

1 small head of cabbage 1 cup stock 

1 cup rice 2 tablespoons olive oil 

1-3 pound mutton 2 cups water 

2^ cups tomato sauce salt, pepper 

Scrape out the center of a small head of cabbage. 
Parboil head of cabbage until tender. Heat olive oil, 
add rice, and when this has partially browned, add 
mutton cut into small pieces. When well browned add 
stock, water, seasonings. Cover and steam until rice 
is soft and meat is tender. Drain cabbage ; fill cavity 
with cooked meat and rice, return to kettle and pour 
tomato sauce around cabbage. Cook in sauce for about 
10 minutes. Serve with sauce. 



86 WARCOOKBOOK 

Patriotic Salads 

VICTORY SALAD. 

Marinate with French dressing, either together or 
separately, 1 cup each cooked carrots, cooked potato 
cubes, cold cooked peas and cold cooked beans. Ar- 
range on lettuce leaves in 4 sections and cover each 
section with mayonnaise or cooked dressing. 

Garnish as desired with chopped whites of ^ ' hard- 
.cooked" eggs, yolks forced through strainer, sliced 
/pickle, chopped olives, parsley, celery or capers. 

* PRUNE SALAD. 

Soak prunes and cook until soft. Remove stones 
and fill prunes with nuts or cream cheese or both. 
Serve on lettuce leaves with mayonnaise cooked or 
French dressing. 

ASPARAGUS SALAD. 

Drain and rinse stalks of canned asparagus. Cut 
rings from a bright red pepper 1-3 inch wide. Place 
3 or 4 stalks in each ring. Arrange on lettuce leaves 
and serve wdth French dressing, to which has been 
added ^^ tablespoon tomato catsup. 

STUFFED TOMATO SALAD. 

Peel medium sized tomatoes. Remove thin slice 
from top of each and take out seeds and some of the 
pulp. Sprinkle inside with salt, invert and let stand 
y2. hour. Fill tomato with cucumbers cut in small 
cubes and mixed with mayonnaise dressing. Arrange 
on lettuce leaves, and garnish top of each with mayon- 
naise dressing forced through a pastry bag or tube. 



WARCOOKBOOK 87 

CHEESE AND OLIVE SALAD. 

Mash a cream cheese, moisten with cream and sea- 
son with salt and pepper. Add 6 olives finely chop- 
ped, lettuce finely cut, and ^ a pimento cut in strips. 
Press in original shape of cheese and let stand 2 hours. 
Cut in slices, separate in pieces and serve on lettuce 
leaves with mayonnaise. 

POTATO SALAD. 

Cut 6 cold boiled potatoes in ^ inch cubes, add 1 
small onion chopped fine and 1 small bunch celery 
cut in small pieces. Add to the chopped whites of 2 
hard boiled eggs. Make a dressing of 4 tablespoons 
iolive oil, 2 tablespoons vinegar, I/2 tablespoon salt, and 
y^ teaspoon pepper. Pour on salad and mix thorough- 
ly. Force yolks of eggs through a strainer and 
sprinkle over salad. Let stand until seasoned thor- 
oughly. Serve on bed of lettuce. Mayonnaise may be 
used in place of olive oil and vinegar. 

NUT, CELERY AND CABBAGE SALAD. 

Mix ^ cup finely cut celery, 1 cup shredded cab- 
bage, 1 cup pecan meats broken in pieces. Moisten 
with boiled dressing or mayonnaise and serve in bowl 
made of small white cabbage head. 

FRENCH FRUIT SALAD. 

2 oranges 

3 bananas 

yi pound malaga grapes 
12 English walnut meats 
1 head lettuce 
French dressing 



88 WARCOOKBOOK 

Peel oranges and remove pulp separately from each 
section. Peel bananas and cut in Y^ inch, slices. Re- 
move skins and seeds from grapes. Break walnut 
meats in pieces. Mix prepared ingredients and ar- 
range on lettuce leaves. Serve with French dressing. 

MACEDOINE SALAD. 

2 cups cauliflower 

2 cups peas 

1 cup carrots 

1 cup celery 
Marinate separately in French dressing cold cook- 
ed cauliflower, peas and carrots, cut in small cubes and 
stalks of celery cut in pieces. Mix separately with 
cooked or mayonnaise dressing. Other vegetables may 
be used. Serve on lettuce. 

JELLIED FRUIT SALAD. 

1 tablespoon granulated gelatin 
yi cup cold water 

y^ cup lemon or orange juice 

2 tablespoons sugar 
y^ teaspoon salt 

few grains cayenne 
1 cup boiling water 
1>4 cups fruit (pineapple, orange, grapefruit, or 
other combinations) 

Soften gelatin in cold water. Mix lemon juice, 
sugar, salt and boiling water. Bring to the boiling 
point and add softened gelatine. Cool, and as the 
mixture begins to thicken, add the fruit cut in pieces. 
Turn into a mould and when firm turn out on a plat- 
ter. Serve with mayonnaise or cooked dressing. 



WARCOOKBOOK 89 

PERFECTION SALAD. 

1 tablespoon granulated gelatin 
y^. cup water 
y^ cup vinegar 

juice of ^ lemon 

1 cup boiling water 
y^. cup sugar 
J4 teaspoon salt 

1 cup cut celery 

^ cup shredded cabbage 
34 cup pimentos cut in strips 

Soften the gelatin in cold water. Mix vinegar, 
lemon juice, salt and boiling water. Bring all to boil- 
ing point and add the softened gelatin. When the 
mixture begins to thicken, add celery, cabbage and 
pimentos and turn into a ring mold, chill, serve with 
mayonnaise dressing. 

FISH SALAD. 

2 cups cooked fish 
1 cup celery 

y. cup French dressing 
1 cup mayonnaise dressing 
Marinate fish in French dressing and when ready 
to serve, drain, mix with celery and add mayonnaise 
dressing. Serve on lettuce. 



90 WARCOOKBOOK 

Wartime Desserts 

APPLE SAUCE CAKE 

1 cup corn syrup 

2 tablespoons mazola oil 

1 cup apple sauce 

2 cups rye flour 
1 teaspoon soda 

2-3 cup raisins 
cinnamon 
cloves 
allspice 

Mix syrup, fat and apple sauce together, add ^ 
amount of flour sifted with soda, spices, and lastly 
raisins dredged with the remaining flour. 

FAYETTE WAR CAKE. 

Yz cup crisco 

1 cup corn flour 

1 cup rye flour 
1^ cups brown sugar 

1 cup apple sauce, unsweetened 
1 cup raisins 
Yz cup nuts 

1 tablespoon cinnamon 

1 teaspoon allspice 

1 teaspoon cloves 

1 teaspoon nutmeg 

1 teaspoon soda 

1 teaspoon baking powder 

1 teaspoon vinegar 

2 eggs 



WARCOOKBOOK 91 

Cream crisco, sugar, yolks of eggs together, add 
apple sauce, meal, ^ amount of flour, baking powder 
and soda sifted together. Then add raisins and nuts 
dredged in the remaining flour, spices, vinegar and 
whites of eggs beaten stiff. Bake in moderate oven 
for 1 hour. 

THE LINCOLN WAR CAKE. 

2 cups buckwheat flour 

2 cups Graham or corn flour 

3 eggs 

4 teaspoons baking powder 
^ cup mazola oil 

1>4 cups karo syrup 
Vz box raisins 



package figs 



Vi cup pecans 
Yi cup dates 
1 teaspoon cinnamon, allspice, cloves 
Sift flour, spice, baking powder. Cut and dredge 
fruit and nuts. Cream mazola oil, karo and yolk of 
eggs. Add flour, then nuts and fruit and lastly Avhite 
of egg. Bake two hours in a slow oven. 

OLD GLORY FRUIT CAKE. 

1 cup brown sugar or 1^ cups syrup 
y^ cup water 

1 cup seeded raisins 

2 ounces citron, cut fine 
1-3 cup shortening 

Yz teaspoon salt 
1 teaspoon nutmeg 
1 teaspoon cinnamon 
1 cup corn flour 
1 cup rye flour 
5 teaspoons baking powder 



92 WARCOOKBOOK 

Boil sugar, water, fruit shortening, salt, and spices 
together in saucepan 3 minutes. When cool, add flour 
and baking powder which have been sifted together. 
Mix well; bake in loaf pan in moderate oven 45 
minutes. 

PLAIN CAKE. 

3 cups barley flour 
1^ cups honey ^ 

Yz cup fat 
2-3 cup milk 
3 eggs 
y\ teaspoon soda 
2 teaspoons baking powder 
1 teaspoon vanilla 
Heat honey, fat and milk until blended. Add ^^'g 
yolks, and when cool, sift in flour, reserving ^ cup. 
After well mixed add vanilla, soda, baking powder, 
and last of flour sifted together. Fold in the well- 
beaten whites last of all. Bake in a moderate oven. 
This makes a large size cake. 

DEVIL'S FOOD CAKE. 

1 cup sorghum 
2-3 cup cane syrup 
1-3 cup fat 
'V/z cups rye flour 
1^ cups barley flour 

1 teaspoon vanilla 

1 teaspoon soda 

1 teaspoon salt 

2 teaspoons baking powder 

2 squares chocolate 

3 eggs 



WARCOOKBOOK 93 

Heat syrups slightly to melt fat and chocolate, 
when cool add egg yolks and the sifted dry ingredients. 
Fold in the well-beaten egg whites last. Bake in lay- 
ers in a moderate oven. 

SPICE CAKE. 

2% cnps rye flour 

^ teaspoon cloves 
lyz teaspoons cinnamon 

^ teaspoon nutmeg 
2^ teaspoons baking powder 

^ teaspoon salt 

1 cup light syrup 
^ cup fat 

2 eggs 

^ cup dark syrup 

}i cup milk 

yi cup chopped citron 

1 cup raisins seeded and cut in halves 

FIG LAYER CAKE. 

1-3 cup fat 
}i cup syrup 

2 eggs 

3 teaspoons baking powder 
1%. cups milk 

2 cups white corn flour 
Scald milk and pour over corn flour. Allow to 
stand for a few hours. Cream fat and sugar. Add 
well-beaten eggs, then the soaked corn flour. Beat 
well, add baking powder. Beat quickly and thor- 
oughly and bake in two layers in moderate oven. Be- 
fore serving, place fig filling between cakes. Whipped 
cream may be served on this. 



94 WARCOOKBOOK 

COOKIES. 
OATMEAL ROCKS. 

2 eggs 

1 cup syrup 

yi cup oleomargarine 
yi cup niazola oil 

2 cups rolled oats 

2 cups barley flour 

1 heaping teaspoon cinnamon 

1 teaspoon allspice 

1 cup raisins 

1 teaspoon soda in ^ cup 

boiling water 

pinch of salt 

Mix syrup, fat and eggs, boiling water with soda, 
add oats, flour, spices and lastly, dredged raisins. 

SPICED OATMEAL CAKES. 

1^ cups rye flour 

y2 cup cooked oatmeal 

y^ cup sugar 

^ cup raisins 

y^ teaspoon soda 

y2 teaspoon baking powder 

y2 teaspoon cinnamon 

3 tablespoons fat 
y^. cup molasses 

Heat the molasses and fat to boiling. Mix with all 
the other materials. Bake in muffin pans for 30 min- 
utes. This makes 12 cakes. 



WARCOOKBOOK 95 

BUCKWHEAT DROP CAKES. 

54 cup fat 

Yi cup corn syrup 

Yt. cup raisins 

1 egg 

34 cup milk 

2 teaspoons baking powder 
\Y\ cups buckwheat flour 

Ya teaspoon salt 
1-3 teaspoon cinnamon 
Y\ teaspoon cloves 

Beat the ^^,%, add sugar and fat with the milk to 
the Q^%% and sugar mixture. Add raisins, drop by 
spoonfuls on a baking sheet and bake. 



BRAN DROP COOKIES. 

2 cups bran 

1 cup wheat flour 

1 teaspoon soda 

2 teaspoons sugar 
Y\ teaspoon salt 

1 well-beaten egg 
Y^ cup molasses 
1 cup milk 

1 cup seeded raisins 

Drop by tablespoons on greased tins and bake in 
moderate oven for 15 to 20 minutes. Dates or figs 
may be used instead of raisins. 



96 WARCOOKBOOK 

CORNMEAL COOKIES. 

y-z cup melted fat 
y-z cup molasses 
y^. cup corn syrup 

1 egg 

6 tablespoons sour milk 
y-i teaspoon soda 

2 cups corn meal 
1 cup wheat flour 

Combine the melted fat, molasses, syrup, beaten 
egg and milk. Sift with dry ingredients and combine 
with the liquid. Drop from a teaspoon on to a greased 
pan and bake in moderate over for 15 minutes. This 
makes 55 to 60 cookies about 2 inches in diameter. 



CORNMEAL GINGERBREAD. 

1 cup corn meal 
1 cup buckwheat 
1 teaspoon soda 
\y^ cups sweet milk, or 
% cup sour milk 
1 teaspoon cinnamon 

1 cup molasses 
y-i teaspoon cloves 
y^ teaspoon salt 

2 teaspoons ginger 

2 tablespoons shortening 

Sift together the dry ingredients. Combine milk, 
molasses, melted shortening. Add the liquid ingredi- 
ents to the dry. Bake in moderate oven. 



WARCOOKBOOK 97 

WARTIME PUDDINGS, CUSTARDS AND PIE 

FILLINGS. 

INDIAN PUDDING. 

5 cups milk 
1-3 cup corn meal 
^ cup molasses 
1 teaspoon salt 
1 teaspoon ginger 
Cook milk and meal in a double boiler 20 minutes, 
add molasses, salt and ginger. Pour into a greased 
pudding dish and bake 2 hours in a slow oven ; serve 
with fruit. 

RICE PUDDING. 
Yz cup rice 
^ cup raisins 
1 cup water 
% stick cinnamon 

1 pint milk 

Yi teaspoon salt 

34 cup corn syrup 

^ teaspoon lemon rind 
Wash rice, pick over raisins and put both on to 
cook v/ith the water and cinnamon. Cook slowly un- 
til water has been absorbed. Add milk, salt and 
syrup. Cook over hot water for about 45 minutes. 
Add grated lemon rind. Serve hot. 

TAPIOCA CUSTARD. 

Xy-z tablespoons minute tapioca 

2 cups scalded milk 
2 eggs 

1-3 cup corn syrup 
54 teaspoon salt 
34 teaspoon vanilla 



98 WARCOOKBOOK 

Add tapioca to milk, cook in double boiler until 
transparent. Add the syrup and the egg yolk beaten 
slightly and salt. Remove and add whites of eggs 
beaten stiff. Add flavoring and chill. 

PRUNE BLANC MANGE. 

4 tablespoons cornstarch 

2 tablespoons syrup or honey 
Yi cup cold milk 
Xy-z cups hot milk 
Yi teaspoon salt 

1 cup cooked prunes 

1 teaspoon vanilla 

Mix the cornstarch in cold milk, add the hot milk, 
salt and syrup or honey, bring to a boil and fii>ish in 
the double boiler. Add the prunes which have been 
cut into small pieces, 5 minutes, before taking off the 
fire. Remove from the fire, add the vanilla, pour into 
molds and chill. If prunes are not left over, double 
amount of syrup. 



DATE CUSTARD. 

2 cups milk 
1-3 or % cup dates 

2 eggs 

^ teaspoon salt 
Yz teaspoon nutmeg 

Cook dates with milk, 15 minutes, in top of double 
boiler. Put through a coarse sieve, then add the 
beaten eggs and salt. Put into individual custard 
cups. Place cups in hot water. Bake in slow oven 
until firm. 



WARCOOKBOOK 99 

OATMEAL BETTY OR BROWN PUDDING. 
Oatmeal Betty 

2 cups cooked oatmeal 

4 apples cut up small 

Yz cup raisins 

Yz cup molasses 

Brown Pudding. 

J4 teaspoon cinnamon 
2 cups cooked oatmeal 
Yz cup molasses 
Yi cup raisins 
Mix and bake for ^ hour. Serve hot or cold. Any 
dried or fresh fruits, dates or ground peanuts may 
be used instead of apples. Either will serve 5 people. 

APPLE TAPIOCA. 

y% cup minute tapioca 

\Y^ cups boiling water 

Ya teaspoon salt 

7 tablespoons corn syrup, or 

4 tablespoons sugar 
Y\ cup raisins 

5 medium sized apples 
^ teaspoon cinnamon 

1 tablespoon lemon juice 
grated rind of 1-3 lemon 
Add tapioca to boiling water and salt, cook in 
double boiler until transparent. Core and pare ap- 
ples and cut into eights. Arrange in greased baking 
pan. To tapioca add raisins, syrup, lemon juice and 
grated rind. Pour this mixture over the apples, 
sprinkle with cinnamon and bake in a moderate oven. 



100 WARCOOKBOOK 

CEREAL MOULD. 

%. pound prunes 
2 cups cooked cereal (meal, rice) 
2 tablespoons dark corn syrup 
J4 teaspoon salt 
]/i teaspoon nutmeg 
yi teaspoon cinnamon 
"Wash prunes, soak. Cook until tender, cool; re- 
•move stones; cut into small pieces. Heat cereal, 
.syrup, salt, spices in double boiler until mixture has 
smooth consistency. Add prunes. Mix well; pour 
into moulds which have been dipped into cold water ; 
chill. Serve with a sauce or with milk. 

PRUNE WHIP. 

J/2 pint cream to whip ^ pound cooked prunes 
Press prunes through sieve and fold into whipped 
cream. Place in greased moulds or mold and chill. 

EGOLESS PLUM PUDDING. 

1 cup bread crumbs 

2 cups rye flour 

4 teaspoons baking powder 
3^ teaspoon salt 

1 teaspoon cloves 

1 teaspoon cinnamon 

1 cup chopped suet 

1 cup seeded raisins 

1 chopped apple 

1 cup molasses 

1 cup milk 
Mix the dry ingredients thoroughly; add the suet 
and the prepared fruit. Mix Avell and add gradually 
the molasses and milk, stirring continually. Steam 
2y2 hours. Serve with sauce. 



WARCOOKBOOK 101 

PASTRIES 

CORN FLOUR PASTRY. 

^ cup corn flour 
Yt. cup wheat flour 
4 teaspoons fat 
^ teaspoon salt 

Enough cold water to mix well 

Mix fat with flour, add enough cold water to mix 
well. Roll thin. 

RYE AND RICE FLOUR PASTRY. 

ly-z cups rye flour 

Ij^ cups rice flour 

1 teaspoon salt 

1 teaspoon baking powder 
^ cup fat 

% cup water 

LEMON PIE. 

134 cups milk 
3 ^^^ yolks, or 

2 rounding tablespoons dried ^^^ 

soaked in 1-3 cup cold water 
1 cup honey 
1 lemon 

1 tablespoon butter substitute 
^ tablespoon cornstarch 

Bring milk and cornstarch to boil. Add honey, 
cool slightly, and pour over ^^% yolks or soaked ^%%. 
Add grated rind and juice of lemon and fat. Pour 
into the partially baked crust and bake until set in a 



102 WARCOOKBOOK 

moderate oven. If fresh eggs are used prepare a 
meringue from the whites, adding 2 tablespoons sugar 
to each white. Bake to set and brown in a slow oven. 

CHOCOLATE PIE. 

1 cup milk 

3 egg yolks 

1 square chocolate 

1 tablespoon butter substitute 

1 teaspoon vanilla 
Yz cup syrup 

Meringue. 

2 ^^g whites 

6 tablespoons sugar 
Beat milk, chocolate and syrup to combine. Add 
butter and pour over the well-beaten yolks. Pour into 
partially baked crust and bake in a slow oven until 
set. Cover with meringue and return to oven to set 
and brown meringue. 

ECLAIRS. 

Yz pint milk 

y^ pound rye flour 

y2 pound oleomargarine 
8 eggs 
Mix the flour and butter together and put into the 
boiling milk and stir briskly over the fire about 1 min- 
ute. Add 8 eggs, two at a time, to the mixture and put 
vthe mixture into pastry bag and then form on a dry 
pan in the shape of fingers and bake in medium oven 
and then fill with pastry cream made of a little corn- 
starch, sugar and yolk of eggs. This makes 2 dozen 
eclairs. 



WARCOOKBOOK 103 

FROZEN DESSERTS 

MAPLE NUT PARFAIT. 

^ cup maple syrup 
2 egg whites 

1 cup whipping cream 
yi cup nuts 

vanilla 

Cook syrup to firm ball. Pour over the well-beaten 
whites. Beat well; when cool fold in the whipped 
cream. Add nuts and flavoring. Pack in ice and salt 
to freeze without stirring. This amount will serve six. 

DATE ICE CREAM. 

2 cups milk 

2 Qg^ yolks 

3 tablespoons syrup 

2 beaten whites 
1 cup dates 

vanilla 

Scald the dates and remove seed. Cook in milk to 
soften and rub through strainer. Mix the yolks and 
syrup and pour the hot milk date mixture over it. 
Freeze. 

ANGEL PARFAIT. 

1^ cups corn syrup (light) 
yi cup water 

3 egg whites 

1 pint heavy cream 
1 tablespoon vanilla 



104 WARCOOKBOOK 

Boil syrup and water until syrup will thread when 
dropped from tip of spoon. Pour slowly on beaten 
whites of eggs and continue the beating until mixture 
is cool. Add cream beaten stiff and vanilla, then pack 
in ice and salt and freeze without stirring. 

SHERBETS. 

1 cup fruit juice 
Yz teaspoon gelatine 
Yz cup honey 

2 tablespoons cold w^ater 
Yz lemon juice 

1 pint water 
Soak gelatine in cold water. Boil the pint of wa- 
ter, and add to the soaked gelatine to dissolve. Add 
honey Avhile still hot, then fruit juices and freeze. The 
above amounts will make a little over a quart of ice. 



WARCOOKBOOK 105 

Wartime Conservation in Clothing 
and Household Textiles 

By Assistant Professor Ruby Buckman, 
University of Kentucky. 

Greatly decreased production in textile fibers and 
fabrics is another result of the war. Shortage in wool 
is greatest both on account of decreased production 
of sheep and on account of the large amount needed 
for soldiers' clothing. Linen is exceedingly scarce 
since, in the United States, we are dependent on im- 
portation from foreign countries, some of which have 
been devastated by war ravages. 

In the near future the shipping of silks from Japan 
and China may have to be curtailed on account of the 
extreme scarcity of war ships. 

Cotton, too, though grown plentifully in our own 
country during normal times, is scarce since it is now 
used so extensively in making hospjtal supplies and 
explosives as well as in replacing other scarcer textiles. 

Soldiers must be clothed first, hence from the pa- 
triotic standpoint, every American woman must con- 
serve textiles of every kind in every possible way. 
The saving which she must do now is only the thrift 
principle which she should practice at all times. 

Household Textiles 

Take an inventory today and instead of buying 
new, see where the old ''on hand" may be utilized 
whenever possible. 



106 WARCOOKBOOK 

Table Linen 

Darn table clothes, napkins and iTinch cloths when 
an accidental hole has been worn. Cut off fringes and 
torn hems and hem again neatly. Make napkins and 
lunch cloths from partly worn table cloths. Save 
every scrap for some purpose. 

If necessary to replenish with new, buy the half 
bleached, as the whole bleach weakens from 15 to 20%. 
A few launderings and allowing to remain overnight 
on the grass will complete the bleaching. Use cotton 
Japanese table cloths and lunch cloths. They are 
cheap, pretty and easy to launder. 

Bedding. 

Where a sheet shows signs of wear down the mid- 
dle, tear, if it is seamless, through exact center, hem 
these edges and whip the outer edges together to form 
a new center. Your time used in conserving textiles is 
of value to your government. Use good parts of badly 
worn sheets as covers for upper edges of comforters. 
Buy new unbleached sheeting and pillow casing. It 
wears much longer and soon bleaches out in the 
laundry. 

Investigate your laundry to be sure no suds are 
used which eat holes in fabrics. 

Avoid elaborate decoration of bed linen. If new 
bed spreads must be purchased, make them of seer- 
sucker or muslin binding the edges in color if desired. 

Eevive the patchwork quilt of a quarter century 
ago or use these made covers for comforter tops. 

Curtains, Towels, etc. 

Cheese cloth makes a good curtain tinted if desired 
according to color scheme of room. Save all flour 
sacks and sugar sacks and use for tea towels or to make 



WARCOOKBOOK 107 

children's under garments. Make wash cloths and 
dish cloths and dish towels of worn face towels and 
bath towels. Use small pieces of knitted underwear 
for wash cloths and patches. Cut off frayed and 
fringed ends of towels and counterpanes and neatly 
hem. Use stocking legs if they can not be made over 
for children for dustless dusters. They should be 
cut open and stitched in a cloth of desired shape. 

Make attractive and durable braided crocheted or 
woven rugs from discarded textiles of all kinds, 
matching up materials, and dyeing to get special 
shades, if necessary. Save all scraps of old carpets or 
clothing and send to rug manufacturers to be made 
into rugs. 

Clothing Textiles. 

Especially when there are children in the family, 
many garments can be made from partly worn adult's 
garments, most successfully. 

Make men's coats, trousers and overcoats into 
smaller garments for boys. The old garment should 
be ripped and well washed or cleaned so as to elimi- 
nate danger from dust germs before making over. 

Make dresses or skirts of good worsted into little 
boy suits. Use good parts of old underwear for mak- 
ing children's garments. Seams should be sewed flat 
and raAv edges finished with crochet picot. Use good 
parts of men's shirts for rompers, aprons, etc. Per- 
cale, gingham, madras and sateen skirts are especially 
useful. Old outing flannel gowns and bathrobes or 
bathrobe blankets can be made into gowns and bath- 
robes for children. 

Children's stockings can be made of grown up's 
castoff 's, using a flat seam. 

Splendid little girl coats and caps can be made 
from old silk or velvet dresses, skirts and wraps. 



108 WARCOOKBOOK 

Make coat suits over into one-piece dresses. One- 
half yard of satin for collar and vest will probably be 
the only new material needed. Many new patterns 
are adaptable. 

Make skirts of silk dresses into petticoats or nse 
them as linings in coats; or use the silk only as a 
flounce on a sateen or percaline petticoat. 

Two evening dresses can often be combined into 
one good one ; or use net over an old evening dress to 
make it as good as new. 

Smart jackets can be made from old velvet coats or 
dresses. 

Make partially worn waists into corset covers or 
dainty camisoles. 

Use gown skirts for making plain petticoats; or 
for bags in which to hang best dresses. 

Make aprons, petticoats or children's dresses from 
the good parts of old house dresses. 

Save accessories when ripping up an old garment. 
Beltings, snaps, hooks and eyes and buttons may be 
used many times. 

Make handkerchiefs of squares of new material left 
in cutting. 

Hats of good quality may be used several seasons 
by having them reblocked and in summer hats, re- 
colored. You can use a bottle of colorite yourself to 
do this. 

Trimmings, materials, even wire and frame mate- 
rial can be used many times in making over old hats. 

Neither throw away nor hoard any piece of mate- 
rial which can be used for some other purpose, and in 
cutting new garments or old, save the small scraps to 
be again rejuvenated by either cloth or paper manu- 
facturers. The rag collector in your town will pay you 
for these scraps. 



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